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Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

If you had been the principal

Posted Thursday, January 17, 2008, at 4:25 PM

Let's take a look back at our high school years and see how we would have judged ourselves in a couple of categories very much in the news today?

Did you ever do anything you would, by today's standards, have punished yourself if you had been the principal?

I would have been very alarmed at me for something I did in my senior year at the old Central High School.

Do any of you recall the old basement in the days when the cafeteria, band room and sports and physical education dressing rooms were located there?

I once reached around the corner and fired a rocket down that long length of hallway and then innocently walked down the hallway to watch my handiwork.

That could have injured someone. Thank goodness luck overuled some stupidity on my part. I did see a few new dance steps as students avoided the rocket.

Did you ever wear anything to school that would have alarmed you if you had been the principal?

I can't plead too guilty to that. I did once wear a very old black derby hat to school. It was frayed around the edges and looked awful.

Of course I didn't wear it to classes, but in the hallways.

The odd thing about it was about a dozen guys wore rather strange hats to school the next day.


Comments
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I wore what ever my mother put out for me to wear and never questioned it, just as I wear what ever my wife puts out for me today.

I guess in 62 years, I still repeat what the lady of the house says (when it comes to clothes) !!!!!

-- Posted by Gale Barber on Thu, Jan 17, 2008, at 9:11 PM

And that should have been respect what the lady of the house says!!!

-- Posted by Gale Barber on Thu, Jan 17, 2008, at 9:22 PM

I do the same Gale. Maybe I come under the heading of Happily Henpecked.

-- Posted by bomelson on Thu, Jan 17, 2008, at 10:53 PM

I can vividly recall wearing those stylish black leather pants and my desert dog hat......Boy, wear was a dress code when I needed it...:-)

-- Posted by tgreader on Fri, Jan 18, 2008, at 10:06 AM

I also remember when all the kool kids had the little alligator on their shirts. Let's not forget the vest faze. Boy now, those were cool. Then after I got out of high school, the "mullet" got popular. Remember getting mine permed...LOL

-- Posted by tgreader on Fri, Jan 18, 2008, at 10:11 AM

LOL! Bo that reminds me of an incident that happened between two coach type people and one janitor type person also back in the early 50's coming out of the old gym on the main floor. We will call the participants John, Pete, and Tom. John and Pete had just come in from track practice and John still had the starter pistol from track practice in his pocket. Tom was coming down the hallway and as John and Pete approached him John said to Tom that he and Pete had been talking it over and that they had decided Tom needed killing and they were going to do it. John then pulled the starter pistol out of his pocket and shot Tom with it. I do not remember anyone getting hurt but there might have been at least one set of wet trousers.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Jan 18, 2008, at 2:42 PM

Maybe I should have said something that allegedly happened.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Jan 18, 2008, at 2:57 PM

I know all three you mention leeiii. Sounds just like John and Pete. Thanks for the memory.

-- Posted by bomelson on Fri, Jan 18, 2008, at 3:17 PM

I remember a teacher once paying the price for my insane stupidity. I had just come into school with a rather large, freshly packed snowball and took what I thought was perfect aim at the rear portion of my best friend's head. However, with me not being to talented as a pitcher, said snowball veered slightly off course and struck the aforementioned teacher right in the kisser. Said teacher, myself and the school then attended shall remain anonymous. I didn't get caught then (35 years ago) and I'm not about to tell on myself now!

-- Posted by Tim Lokey on Sun, Jan 20, 2008, at 9:08 PM

I remember a teacher once paying the price for my insane stupidity. I had just come into school with a rather large, freshly packed snowball and took what I thought was perfect aim at the rear portion of my best friend's head. However, with me not being to talented as a pitcher, said snowball veered slightly off course and struck the aforementioned teacher right in the kisser. Said teacher, myself and the school then attended shall remain anonymous. I didn't get caught then (35 years ago) and I'm not about to tell on myself now!

-- Posted by Tim Lokey on Sun, Jan 20, 2008, at 9:09 PM

Ooops! I think I hit the wrong button. Sorry for the double posting. By the way, does anyone remember those cool swede harness boots, faded jeans and Levi jackets, with preferrably a Skynyrd shirt on underneath? Back when if you had a note from your parents you could smoke at school? (I know...a long time ago) I can also remember the first time teachers were allowed to wear pant suits! LOL

-- Posted by Tim Lokey on Sun, Jan 20, 2008, at 9:15 PM

Yes, as a matter of fact I do remember. We had an organized club at school called the Lemac club which all of the smokers belonged to. Lemac spelled backwards spells CAMEL.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Jan 20, 2008, at 9:58 PM

The good Lord was looking out for all of us,I think.

Are the kids being punished now under "zero tolerance" any worse than we were?

How often are their fashion foibles and lapses in judgement more serious than those we survived?

Few of us were angels.

Most of us were never caught or the people in authority insisted on our having more chances to get things right and become decent human beings.

We weren't often afforded the luxury of being written off as losers.

Surely,then and now,some troubled youth were turned out into the world with no one having the least idea of the turmoil within them and where it might lead.

Today,a principal has to have the paranormal power to detect who is indulging in innocent horseplay and who is a criminal or mentally ill.

He has to know,in advance,which events are going to lead to fond childhood memories and which are going to wind up on Court T.V.

Our heightened sensitivities mean that while one generation could say "you need killin'" while holding a pistol and have everyone go on to have happy,productive lives,the current times could have children pass notes saying "Today is the day" and get put in alternative school,have to repeat a grade and face felony charges.

Our fondness for litigation means that a lawsuit or insurance claim could result from a missfired snowball-even if no one was injured.

It's a wonder anyone has the courage to either deal with students or teachers who might be dangerous or let people occasionally be silly and foolish.

I'd hate to be a kid nowadays.

At a time when we're in doubt about how mature or even human we are,our society goes back and forth between treating us like mini-adults and dealing with us as if we had no need or ability to take responsibility for ourselves.

The sad truth is,our children (like us) are ordinary mortals and works-in-progress.

They can no more be wrapped in cotton wool and caged in a risk-free environment until age 21 than they can be allowed to be "emancipated" before they're toilet-trained and permitted to go as feral as one can get in front of a video screen.

Children need good role models to emulate as they figure out what being a good person means.

They need to have opportunities to try on adult behavior and,maybe,look ridiculous doing it.

They need to challenge what they've been told and dare authority to live up to the standards it imposes.

They need to test their boundaries so they'll know what lines to cross,when and why.

We don't give our youth the chances to be kids we had.

We can't trust them that much.

Maybe that's why some recent generations have never gotten past adolescence.

Maybe they never got to complete being children and rehearsing being an adult.

I worry that the current generations are growing old without growing up while previous generations matured without ever growing old-even after living sixty or seventy or eighty years.

I hope someone wiser than I can figure out the proper formula for nurturing clever,kind,responsible people.

I hope we give the good teachers and administrators the freedom to use it.

-- Posted by quantumcat on Mon, Jan 21, 2008, at 4:55 AM

something about fire alarms. I was such a goody-two-shoes, they never suspected....

-- Posted by mmp84 on Tue, Jan 22, 2008, at 9:09 AM

The only thing I can think of that I would've given myself a detention or repremand for was that every morning this one person would get out of their vehicle, and click the alarm three times just so everyone knew it was on. It said "this car has been alarmed" outloud in the parking lot. It was annoying and let's face it, the parking lot at Central was not a hotbed of crime. So I made it my mission to walk by said car every morning and lift up the door handle, just to make the alarm go off. I only did it for about a month before it bored me but it was fun while it lasted.

-- Posted by LauraSFT on Tue, Jan 22, 2008, at 10:44 AM

I was a hardened criminal.

I'd leave campus during homeroom and get junk food or whatever from the store across the street.

Upon my return,I might see the nefarious villains who were getting drinks at the Co-Cola plant and selling them at a profit.

Some of us even came to school with mustaches and muttonchops despite the ban on facial hair.

(We were all girls but...)

It's a wonder we didn't send someone to the hospital with our peanut butter breath or spread salmonella by dropping frogs down people's backs.

No telling what kind of pollution we made when we took baggies of old stable dust and burned a little of the dung and binder twine in the bathroom sink.

(When we got caught with [rhymes with bit] in our lockers,it was real manure.)

I think nowadays students aren't allowed to graduate until they've completed detention.

If those standards had been around in my youth,a whole lot of us would still be writing off for Mr. Scott.

-- Posted by quantumcat on Wed, Jan 23, 2008, at 6:45 AM

Haaaa Mr Scott I remember him well..we did drive that poor man crazy.

I do seem to remember something about calling in bomb threats also (which God help the child that did something like that in this world now, they would be picked up by homeland security for being a terrorist) In fact I am kinda nervous about even writing the word :>)

-- Posted by Dianatn on Thu, Jan 24, 2008, at 12:20 AM

I think our police "profilers" guessed what kind of terrorist phoned in every Friday before fifth period.

Alas,not even seeing a mushroom cloud or having people keel over from serin gas would have kept our teachers from having those end-of-the-week tests.

These were people who'd seen schools explode-on film,at least.

As long as the school stood,their job was to educate us in the 3 R's and how to be worthy human beings.

If the bomb had been real,they'd have just taught any survivors in a portable classroom the following Monday.

-- Posted by quantumcat on Thu, Jan 24, 2008, at 1:37 PM

Yeah it was always kinda neat to get to go to the football field during classtime though.

Remember the Drug Checks: (Over the intercom you heard) Everyone get yur belongs from your locker and assemble on the football field.

LOL kinda makes me laugh even now..everybody knew what was going on it was a locker check..if you had something in your locker you didn't want anyone to see now was the time to get it

-- Posted by Dianatn on Fri, Jan 25, 2008, at 11:21 AM

My locker always spilled out over half the county when and if you could get the door open.

I'd cull and straighten things out every Thursday and by Friday,it would look like Fibber MgGee's closet (old radio show reference).

The worst contraband we had were German jump ropes and those fist-sized sweet tarts.

(Food bans reminded me of Amy March from "Little Women" and her pickled limes.)

-- Posted by quantumcat on Fri, Jan 25, 2008, at 6:06 PM


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Bo Melson is a retired sports and police beat editor of the Times-Gazette.
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