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Friday, Nov. 28, 2014

Looking back: Where was it?

Posted Thursday, April 9, 2009, at 10:40 AM

Picking up on a suggestion from leeiii, here's a continuing post on which you're all welcome to list Shelbyville streets (or county roads, for that matter) and what could formerly be found along them and when.

Depot Street in the 1970s: A Rexall drug store was in the corner building now occupied by Jo Jo's (and that building was First National Bank in the 1920s -- it's engraved near the roof). Also on that block were Peoples National Bank, Castner-Knott and H & H Department Store. Across the street, in the building which collapsed last year, was, I think, Hames-Daughtery Drug Store in the 1960s. Down the street were Shelbyville Sport Shop (not Sport's'), Shelbyville Record Shop when Austin Davis still sold records, and across the street were the Princess/Capri Theater and the furniture store known as Lewis & Thomas, Woosley & Thomas and several other names over the years. Cannon Chevrolet was in the big empty lot across from First Baptist Church (seems like a good place for a convenience store today) and a used car dealership was where the Times-Gazette parking lot is today.


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I remember years ago there being a small grocery store on Madison St. somewhere around where the old Bi Lo is now. Seems like it was really close to the road. Didn't Dairy Queen used to be there close to it as well. I think there is some sort of check cashing place there now.

-- Posted by titansfan on Thu, Apr 9, 2009, at 10:55 AM

You're probably thinking of United Super Market, which operated under several other names including, I think, Dennis' Super Market. It was demolished around 1983-84 or so for Bi-Lo. The DQ was where you're thinking. That building replaced a little blue and white building which had been the DQ since the 1940s or 1950s.

-- Posted by David Melson on Thu, Apr 9, 2009, at 11:37 AM

Shelbyville Supermarket No. 2 was the store where Bi-Lo is.

-- Posted by gordo1965 on Thu, Apr 9, 2009, at 11:37 AM

titansfan,

You may be referring to Shelbyville Super Market #2 which was owned by the Baker family and run by Kenny Baker. They were a great family and I was privelged to have gotten to work there during high school.

It also seems like Dairy queen might have been the next builing going toward tullahoma. I think Jerry Wayne Burrow later had a used car lot there and his wife ran a beauty shop.

-- Posted by parkerbrothers on Thu, Apr 9, 2009, at 11:41 AM

David since you mentioned Rexall, I can remember back in the late 40's or early 50's Rexall was located on the South Side of the square between the Bedford Theatre and Knox Pitts. They always had a nail keg of horehound cough drops turned over in the show window with the cough drops spilled out.

(60's) Austin-Lyons jewelry was between Hames-Daughtry and the Princess Theatre.

(50's) Between Woosley & Thomas furniture and Boyd's Chevrolet & Oldsmobile was the Goodyear Store and Jack Palmer produce. Between Woosley & Thomas and the Princess was Fritzsche's Purina store. The first time I ever saw a colored chicken and colored duck was at Fritzsches. Fritzsche later moved to the corner of Depot and Deery

(40's and 50"s) On the other corner of Depot and Deery was Landers Service Station known in the 60's as Guy Landers Gulf Station.

(40's and 50's) Between Boyd's Chevrolet & Oldsmobile and Yearwood Motors was 2 or 3 houses. Dr. W. H. Avery had his office in one of those houses, and later after Dr. Avery died a Dr. Burch had that same space, and then Dr. Frierson before he moved to Madison street.

(40's and 50's) United Super Market was mentioned. I very well remember when Mr. Dennis started that store. Later James Dennis and his brother ran the store. Across the street on the corner of Madison and Evans was Johnny Walker Grocery. Donnie Thompson's father ran the store before Johnny Walker.

That has gotten some pretty good memories flowing. I will remember more that should be added later I am sure.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Apr 9, 2009, at 12:12 PM

Wasn't there an A&W here somewhere at one time??

Also wasn't Kroger at Big Springs Shopping Center I know there was a grocery store there called Cooper and Martin because I remember taking my grandmother there when I was in High School. But it seems like Kroger was there at one time also.

-- Posted by Dianatn on Thu, Apr 9, 2009, at 4:46 PM

Yes, Kroger was on the side closest to the jail. Also Enzfelter's A & W Root Beer Stand was on Madison Street beside the old Bowling Alley. That reminds me that we used to set pins for each other to bowl when business was slow.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Apr 9, 2009, at 5:02 PM

The root beer stand was on the lot Shelbyville Motor Company expanded into in the (60's?).

I don't remember the bowling alley that well.

Was it to the right of the "root beer joint" or was it where Mr. Farrar,Mr. Enochs,etc. had their car lot?

(I remember a gas station to the left of that Chrysler franchise.)

I think the beauty shop on Madison also clipped poodles.

Where was Kitty's beauty salon?

I think it was on the same side as Pope's,Simmons' Jewelry store,etc.

(Speaking of the Simmons family,Dot's Tot shop was the precursor to the ladie's apparel shop on the corner across the side street from the Princess Theatre.

They sold items for babies and small children plus "look-don't touch" dolls like the Madame Alexander line.

One Madison Street gas station had a monkey on the premises (60's or 70's).

Didn't the cab stand used to be in Dr. Moncur's old office ?

Where was the little country store near East Side School?

-- Posted by quantumcat on Fri, Apr 10, 2009, at 12:38 PM

Quantumcat, I think the bowling alley building is still standing. It was on the corner of Alton Ave. and Madison Street. Both the Bowling Alley and United Cities Gas was in the same building in the 50's.

I think that the gas station you mentioned would be Gilbert Landers Shell station. It was on the corner of Deery and Madison. Shelbyville Motors kind of wrapped around the station having frontage on both Madison and Deery.

As best as I can remember it the order of businesses from left (Deery) to right (Alton) would be Landers Shell, Shelbyville Motors, A & W Root Beer, United Cities Gas, and Madison Street Bowling Lanes.

As for the country store. If you are standing on Belmont looking up toward East Side School, if my memory serves me correctly, I think that there was a country store on the back side of the school. That might have been on Elliot Street. Also, I think that there was a store building on Dunnaway Street across from the school. That building was later used for a non-denominational Church.

Time has a way of erasing some of my memory. I can not place Kitty's as being on that side of the square. I do know that she operated out of her house at one time. I believe that was on Atkinson close to where Regent Drive cuts through the housing project.

Quantumcat, I have read some of your posts before. You and I must be about the same age because it seems as if we remember some of the same things.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Apr 10, 2009, at 1:53 PM

Kitty's Beauty Salon was located next to the Dixie Hotel on the North Side of the Square, maybe part of the hotel building. I remember in the early 60's one of the city offices was next to Kitty's. I want to think that it was once a clothing store named "Burkhalter's". Help me some of you that might have a better memory than I.

-- Posted by cookie on Fri, Apr 10, 2009, at 2:24 PM

Cookie, yes Burkhalter's sounds right to me. In my mind I keep getting Burkhalter's and Cohn-Glazer confused. I do remember that one of them had shades made of a yellow film substance that hung in the show windows. I can only guess that the purpose was to keep the sun from fading the clothing.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Apr 10, 2009, at 2:32 PM

Cookie, yes Burkhalter's sounds right to me. In my mind I keep getting Burkhalter's and Cohn-Glazer confused. I do remember that one of them had shades made of a yellow film substance that hung in the show windows. I can only guess that the purpose was to keep the sun from fading the clothing.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Apr 10, 2009, at 2:33 PM

Cookie, yes Burkhalter's sounds right to me. In my mind I keep getting Burkhalter's and Cohn-Glazer confused. I do remember that one of them had shades made of a yellow film substance that hung in the show windows. I can only guess that the purpose was to keep the sun from fading the clothing.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Apr 10, 2009, at 2:34 PM

leeii,

We must be about the same age. I do remember that the shades were a faded yellow and also remember that the store was dark and dreary looking. I don't remember if it was a department store or a men's store. Don't remember my parents ever really shopping there.

-- Posted by cookie on Fri, Apr 10, 2009, at 2:37 PM

Cookie, yes if you are who I think you are you are about 3 years younger than me. I think that you would have been a majorette with Phyllis Ann, Pudgy, Marie, and others.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Apr 10, 2009, at 2:53 PM

I think we are "baby boomers",leeiii and cookie.

I remember the Dixie Hotel location,now that you mention it.

-- Posted by quantumcat on Fri, Apr 10, 2009, at 3:45 PM

Yes, and I think that I am confusing Kitty's and Hattie's. It seems to me that I can remember a beauty shop at the hotel. I am thinking that it was on the left side of the horseshoe like entrance.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Apr 10, 2009, at 4:29 PM

leeiii,

Yes, you are right. I am the "Cookie" that was a majorette eons ago. Kitty's was on the left side of the hotel, but I don't remember Hattie's.

-- Posted by cookie on Fri, Apr 10, 2009, at 8:37 PM

I think that Hattie's is the one I am thinking about that was in a house on Atkinson, but I can not be sure. I have slept since then.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sat, Apr 11, 2009, at 7:18 AM

Ok, I need a little help from someone older than me. I remember my dad stopping many times (about 1958-1959) to get me an orange cola at some restaurant or possibly little market that was along North Main Street about where O'Reilly's Auto parts is now. I just want to know the name of the place. While we're going down memory lane, I need to mention that Whitman's Bakery was once right in the same area about where they just torn down the old senior citizens building. This stroll down memory lane is fun--keep it going!!

-- Posted by justwanaknow on Sat, Apr 11, 2009, at 10:23 AM

I first remember Whitman's Bakery being just off the square about 2 or 3 doors down on North Main. Then after urban renewal Mr. Whitman moved to Lane Parkway. I am out of touch when you name new businesses. I would need to know where O'Reilly's is such as between which two streets. There were several stores and restaurants on North Main through the years.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sat, Apr 11, 2009, at 10:40 AM

Also, before it was Whitman's Bakery it was Becker's Bakery.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sat, Apr 11, 2009, at 10:42 AM

I remember going into a store called Nina's with my mom back in the 60's. I think Rexall Drugs might have been next door or close. Also remember the popcorn stand. It was still there the last time I visited the square. Is Freeman's Shoe Shop the location of the old bowling alley?

-- Posted by dh38583 on Sat, Apr 11, 2009, at 1:10 PM

Yes, I think you are right about Freeman's. It seems to me that I can remember Freeman's being in the old bowling alley. I also remember Nina's on the square as well as the popcorn stand. At one time there was a McKee's mens store there close to the popcorn stand. Mr. Pruitt ran the popcorn stand for years. I can not remember who else might have run it at one time or another.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sat, Apr 11, 2009, at 2:35 PM

The place with the orange soda *might* have been the Bridle.

I remember several locally owned restaurants had "horsey" names back then.

The Saddle was in the current El Mexico location and still looked like a dark brown,brick house.

The Golden Spur was a later addition housed in the Tony Rice Center building close to the 41 Drive-In.

It seems like the Stirrup was closer to Bedford Drugs (formerly,Renegar's second,North Main location).

-- Posted by quantumcat on Sat, Apr 11, 2009, at 4:34 PM

Somebody please help me out with this one. As I have been thinking about stores on the square my memory has gotten kind of foggy. Someone please tell me what block of buildings constituted the Scudder building.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sat, Apr 11, 2009, at 6:16 PM

(40's and 50's) United Super Market was mentioned. I very well remember when Mr. Dennis started that store. Later James Dennis and his brother ran the store. Across the street on the corner of Madison and Evans was Johnny Walker Grocery. Donnie Thompson's father ran the store before Johnny Walker.

That has gotten some pretty good memories flowing. I will remember more that should be added later I am sure.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Apr 9, 2009, at 12:12 PM

There was also a grocery store, operated by Vasco Edwards on Madison St. I think it was about half way between Deery St. and Evans St., on the left going out, and there were some steps going up to the store.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Jun 21, 2009, at 4:34 PM

Somebody please help me out with this one. As I have been thinking about stores on the square my memory has gotten kind of foggy. Someone please tell me what block of buildings constituted the Scudder building.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sat, Apr 11, 2009, at 6:16 PM

leeiii, the Scudder building is on the East side of the square, but for the life of me I can't remember which building it is. Will try to get more definitive info for you soon.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Jun 21, 2009, at 6:33 PM

All I can remember is that the facade had P. J. Scudder engraved in stone up on the second level.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Jun 21, 2009, at 7:59 PM

It seems that with the exception of Smith's grocery we have completely ignored the business aspect of Elm St., and there were several businesses that I wish photos could be located for, and of course a picture of B.C.T.S. in it's "prime" would be nice.

Across the road from the school in the mid to late fifties there was Gant's Cleaners,and the Indian motorcycle dealer (I want to say George Titsworth?) And there was still a rock fence there in those days, which kinda takes me back to the country. Have I missed anyone at that location?

Coming back a little farther, and on the other side of Elm St., Ned Delk had his business, and a little farther back, I think in the vicinity of where Fashion Cleaners built, Gene Overcast operated a wholesale produce business.

Coming on back to Central High School and looking across Elm, there was a Red Ace station there. A street beside the station wound around to Atkinson St., just North of E. Lane St. I can't remember the name of this street but somewhere along its short length was located Sanders Body Shop. Not sure which Sanders owned this shop, but I am leaning toward B.H.

So there are several businesses in a rather small area that I really would like to see pictures of. Of course it probably is not realistic to expect to find all of them, or maybe even find any of them. But as is written, "Hope springs eternal...."

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Jun 21, 2009, at 9:18 PM

Wow ilikeoldsongs, you have really gotten the visual juices flowing now.

The rock fence I remember well. I have got a suspicion that many young couples sat on that wall and courted before school and after school, and maybe even during school unless Professor Harris caught them. If you have access to the T-G Sesquicentinnal Edition dated Oct. 7, 1969 you can find a picture of the BCTS football team on page 242 sitting on the steps in the front of the school. I do not know the date of the picture but judging by the helmets (which were always hand me downs from CHS) I would guess it to be late '40's or early '50's. Wow, 82 games without a defeat. Now that is some more record.

Yes, I remember Gant's Cleaners setting right in the bend of the road. It was a target for any car that was coming from Unionville at too great a speed. I can remember that one time the cleaners was almost knocked from it foundation as a car crashed into it. It is possible that the T-G might have a picture of that crash in its archives of negatives. I can not remember whether there was a fatality or not.

Ah yes, Tittsworth Motorcycles. I remember it well. I can not remember the name of "old man" Tittsworth, but it seems to me it was Ralph Tittsworth, Sr. I can remember that Ralph Jr. put on a motorcycle racing exhibition at the horse show grounds maybe in the late '40's or early '50's. It seems to me that he was riding a Harley.

I remember Ned Delk's florist shop as well as the Produce Stand, but I did not remember who owned and ran it. I just remember the great shade tree.

There was a string of storefronts between the Red Ace station and Milners-Shelbyville Super Market-Bakers but I do not remember who occupied those buildings. I seems to me that a Tucker may have been in one of them.

I am not sure who ran Sanders Body Shop. It could have been B. H., or it could have been his father. Either way I am sure that the Sanders boys learned their trade at that place.

Further out toward Unionville Clyde Landers had an upholstery shop, and a little further out Leslie Little had an upholstery shop, and later his Bee business. Speaking of upholstery there was a mattress manufacturing concern on Bridge Street at some point in time. I should be able to remember who the proprietor was, but it escapes me at the moment.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Jun 22, 2009, at 8:26 AM

Just a few (useless) comments.I do have access to the 1969 book, (my second,actually)and it is yellowed and trying to fall apart, much like myself. I should have taken better care of it through the years.Speaking of the B.C.T.S.football team, I got to see them play part of one game when I was about 14.They played a team out of Nashville, I think it was Pearl. The Pearl quarterback was ambidextrous(?). Never saw that before of since, and since he didn't have a lot of luck with either arm I have wondered in later years if it was just a ploy to try to loosen up the run defense.

And speaking of the bend in the road, did you know that at one time the road didn't curve at that point, but continued straight ahead for some distance toward Atkinson St.? This can be seen on the D.G.Beers 1878 Districts map of Bedford County. Go to the Bedford county site of tngenweb, click on map resources, then D.G. Beers map, then click the Shelbyville District link.Very interesting map if you've never seen it before.I can even use it to pinpoint the location of my house during a portion of the years 1942-'43, before we moved back to Columbia,Tn.

Gene Overcast used to stop by now and then, not too often,and play a few hands of "tonk" at the coal yard on North Main. Always liked gene, and the whole family for that matter, they were all good folks.

I believe you are right about a Tucker being one of the tenants in the group of businesses across from the high school.I want to associate candy and such with the name, and think that Raymond might have been a first name involved.A Raymond Tucker built a nice brick home on Fairfield Pike between Brown's Lane and Richdale Lane many years ago, and I've always associated him with candy.

Also, at the lower end of the grocery store and to the left(?) of the entrance, a Dr. Fuston had an office there in the early fifties.(or could this have been before it was a grocery.I was a patient there one time, and seems as though I entered through the same door as the store used, I really can't remember there being two doors.)

Well, you got me leeiii, on the mattress factory.I simply can't recall ever hearing about it.Let me ask you this about another event that happened before my time, so to speak.Do you recall anything about a stove foundry located on the Fayetville highway that burned down?

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Jun 22, 2009, at 11:51 AM

ilikeoldsongs I will get back to you in a few minutes. I have to run to the bank and give them some money so they can have some operating capital LOL.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Jun 22, 2009, at 12:46 PM

OK, now the bank should be able to operate at least until closing time.

The quarterback throwing with either arm to loosen up the run defense makes sense to me. I know that the Tigers were such a strong team that I can imagine the teams they played being willing to try and gain any advantage possible (legal or not). In that string of 82 games without defeat there was also a string of 31 straight games when they were not even scored on.

Yes, I am familiar with the tngenweb maps and access them often.

I am having a hard time placing the location of the coal yard on North Main. Could you tell me where it was located? Somehow Overcast and Coal yards go together. I know that Joe Overcast used to have a coal yard over by the football practice field.

Bingo! Raymond rings a bell when connected with Tucker, and also candy rings another bell. I believe you have solved that mystery for me.

Ah yes, Dr. Fuston. We probably would not be alive today had it not been for Dr. Fuston's ointment---that black paste with that very distinctive odor. My Mother swore by Dr. Fuston's ointment and used it on me liberally. There is no telling how much money she saved in Tetanus shots.

Sorry, I do not have a memory of the Stove foundry. How far out the Fayetville Highway was it?

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Jun 22, 2009, at 3:08 PM

I am having a hard time placing the location of the coal yard on North Main. Could you tell me where it was located? Somehow Overcast and Coal yards go together. I know that Joe Overcast used to have a coal yard over by the football practice field.

Before Joe was over by the practice field, he and Bill Haley(no,not the singer)had a spot beside the pure oil station, not the station owned by the Tune brothers across from the Black house,but the one across from the Mill End Center, owned by Houston Prosser in the early fifties,then by Bobby G. Sanders in the late fifties.This site is presently occupied by O'rileys Auto Parts,which was mentioned by an earlier poster in regard to soft drinks.I haven't been able to resolve that poster's question, which I think was directed to you,by the way.(justwannaknow?)

The stove foundry was located about 3 miles from the square, I would guess, between Naron Rd. on the right, and Womack Rd. on the left.If you're familiar with the location of the new National Guard Armory, it was just a little ways past it, on the left side of the Fayetteville highway.A couple of stone pillars mark the former entrance, or did the last time I was out that way,three or four years ago.

Look on page 232 of the 1969 book, and look closely at the picture of the two men in the boat.I would love to have a copy of this picture that was suitable for framing just because of the amount of information that it contains.First, on a personal note, I believe that the man in the back is Aubrey McConnel himself,who I became acquainted with, along with his family, in 1958.

Secondly, the boat is positioned very nearly on top of the present day flume which collapsed recently.

Thirdly, the boat is pointed directly where Joe Overcast's coal yard was located.

Fourthly, This is an excellent historical shot of the colored church which was torn down in,I believe, the 1960's.(this church, along with another on Lane St.can be found on the 1878 Beers map).

Fifthly, in the distance, on the left side of the road can be seen the Pure Oil sign across from the Black House.

In the distance, and on the right side there is a vertical sign whose first three letters were HUD, but the bottom letters are obscured by other signs.Did we ever have a Hudson automobile dealership here? If not, I wonder what business this sign represented.So many questions,so few answers.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Jun 22, 2009, at 5:41 PM

Yep, now that you have located the coal yard for me I remember exactly where it was. I was trying to place it a little further out North Main. However, I was not aware that Joe and Bill were in business together. I remember Bill being in the National Guard for many years. By the way George and Brooks also had this Pure station at one time in the '60's and on into the '70's because that is where I used to work on my car. After George died Joyce continued to run it and even had the bus station there for a while. No, I have not been able to pinpoint the store where justwannaknow got his orange drinks from. I was thinking it may have been at H. Clays but now I am pretty sure that is not right either.

As for the stove foundry I can place the stone pillars but I still have no memory of the foundry.

You are right, that picture does contain a wealth of information. It is possible that David may have access to that photo if it became the property of the T-G. On that same page you can see Charlie Chockley on top of his house. I grin every time I think of Charlie crawling up on top of his house every time he was threatened by high which was often.

You are right about that sign looking like it might be Hudson but I cannot place a Hudson dealership in my feeble memory. I know that Yearwood Motors was just a little further up toward the square, but I cannot remember if they handled Hudson as well. The next sign this side of the Hud___ sign looks like a Red Ace sign with the big red X with Red Ace across it. It seems to me that I can vaguely remember Red Ace being there. It seems to me that they had the dishes and when you bought gas you could get a dish.

By the way, do you remember Puckett and Lentz shoe repair there close to the Black House?

I am really enjoying this exercise in memory stimulation and I believe you are as well.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Jun 22, 2009, at 7:34 PM

Around the late 80's into the early 90's, I think, Joyce Tune operated a service station at E. Cedar and N. Main, and the bus station was there i'm pretty sure. This may have been her last retail business venture, I think she pretty much settled into local politics after that.

I've thought some about this orange drink situation,and have reached the following conclusion.During the time frame given, the only grocery store that I can recall between the square and Edgemont would be Newell's Market, which was located toward the Northern end of the same block as Bud's cafe.

And speaking of Charlie Chockley, I wonder if he is the Chockley that ran a moving service, and was the one that moved us from Columbia back to Shelbyville in 1950. I remember it was a Chockley, don't remember the first name.

This is kind of weird: The names Puckett and Lentz almost jumped off the screen when I saw them, but I can't get a mental image of thier location in my mind.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Tue, Jun 23, 2009, at 8:21 AM

ilikeoldsongs, I think that Robert Newell's Market is indeed a possibility.

Charley Chockley did have a moving service, so that is a possibility.

Puckett and Lentz Shoe Shop was a little white building and to the best of my memory it was right beside the Black House between the Black House and the Borden Milk Plant.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Jun 23, 2009, at 12:04 PM

leeiii, don't know what you are looking for exactly in a country music archive,but you might check out the link below when you have a minute.I just ran across it this morning, so haven't had a chance to evaluate it at all, however, at first glance it seems they might have some rather obscure titles, which could prove valuable as a reference source.

bacm.users.btopenworld.com

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Tue, Jun 23, 2009, at 12:05 PM

Thanks. I will take a look at it.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Jun 23, 2009, at 12:13 PM

ilikeoldsongs, since you helped me to locate Joe and Bill's coal yard, I have been trying to visualize the area. Am I correct when I think that there might have been a small ice house in that area as well.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Jun 23, 2009, at 6:44 PM

Yeah, the ice house was located on the premises with the coal yard, thats where we played cards now and then.I may be suffering from a greater degree of Alzheimers than I realize, but I can't recall it actually being used to store ice during the time I hung around there,but rather just an office.The "ice runs" that I'm familiar with originated on Deery St., and from there we would go flying all over town, picking off various size chunks as needed.(well, actually I was just along for the ride now and then).

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Tue, Jun 23, 2009, at 7:30 PM

A visualization problem. Seems like during the 1950's - 60's, one of the most frequently advertised businesses on the radio was Fred Phillips Furniture Co., but I am unable to zero in on his location at that time. I clearly remember several years later that they had a "piano" business at Holland & North Jefferson,( now the 82 by-pass). Were they always at this location? Did I drive by there 3726 times without realizing it was Fred Phillips Furniture?

I don't question the fact that I have always, to a certain degree, been afflicted with "tunnel vision", but this is really bugging me.

Would appreciate any help.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Jun 29, 2009, at 9:01 AM

ilikeoldsongs, I remember the Holland street location as both for Furniture and for Pianos. It seems to me that Pianos became a bigger item when Fred Jr. (who was a tremendous piano player) became a part of the business. I will have to scratch my brain cells to see if I can come up with another location.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Jun 29, 2009, at 9:47 AM

"ilikeoldsongs, I remember the Holland street location as both for Furniture and for Pianos. It seems to me that Pianos became a bigger item when Fred Jr. (who was a tremendous piano player) became a part of the business. I will have to scratch my brain cells to see if I can come up with another location."

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Jun 29, 2009, at 9:47 AM

leeiii, I think you are right, as I now seem to remember the phrase "changing over to the piano business" in association with Phillips, and you're right about Jr. becoming "the man" when that happened.

Another question about the businesses on the square. In the early 1950's, on the West side of the square, to the right of the fire dept., and about where the present street enters the square, I have a strong image of a business named Hoover Furniture and Appliances being there. I believe this is where my dad bought my mother a washing machine, about 1952 or '53. Now that I've managed to ignore Fred Phillips for 20 years, I'm wondering if this could be a figment of my imagination?

Again, any help appreciated.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Jun 29, 2009, at 10:51 AM

ilikeoldsongs, you have caused me to dig out some of my reference books to find some answers.

In the book "Postcard Memories Of Bedford County, Tennessee Bicentennial Celebration 2007" on page 61 mention is made of Fred Phillips Furniture being on the Northwest Corner of the square. This is backed up by a picture on page 44 of the book "A Pictorial History Of Bedford County" which says that Fred Phillips Furniture & Jewelry is in the background. In the Central High School yearbooks of 1954-1958 the Fred Phillips ad says "You'll find it at Fred's on the low rent corner. Maybe this indicates that he has moved off the square into a lower rent area which Holland would be.

To answer another blogger in one of the Picturing the Past series. They had asked about a picture of the stave mill on East Lane. On page 31 of the "A Pictorial History Of Bedford County" you can find a picture of the stave and slat mill. As a reference the W. P. Cooper house is in the background.

ilikeoldsongs, on page 17 of "A Pictorial History Of Bedford County" there is a picture of "Old Mack" sitting in front of the Fire Hall. To the right in the picture you can see HOO--- on the front of the building. I am reasonably sure that is Hoover Furniture. Also on page 9 you can see that Farm Bureau once occupied that building, and on page 18 you can see that Gray Livery Stable also once occupied that same space.

On page 61 of this same book is a picture that shows the little white building beside the Black House where Puckett and Lentz Shoe Shop was located.

On page 65 you can see the Oertels 51 Beer sign that marked the location of Hazletts, and in this same picture you can see the Texaco sign that marked the site of L. T. Bellar Pontiac.

Also, on page 94 is the Tom Burk home which I had mentioned before, and on page 111 is a picture of Albert Bailey at the Ice Plant on Deery Street.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Jun 29, 2009, at 2:37 PM

"ilikeoldsongs, you have caused me to dig out some of my reference books to find some answers."

An outstanding post! Thanks a lot for the information and the effort required to find and organize it.

As I recall, Bedford Coal Company was also on East Lane St., operated by Bud Shapard, who later on got into the real estate sales business. Next door was R.L.Patterson, and on the corner was Culligan Water Service. Across East Lane was Polly's Apartments, owned by the Aderholt's, I believe. Turn the corner toward Depot St., and there was Kincaid's T.V. Service, then Seymour&Peck, in Eddie Huffman's big old black building.

Across from Seymour&Peck was the ice plant, and that gets us back to Albert Bailey. I've been trying off and on for several days to recall his first name, since everyone just called him by his last name. He worked there for a long time with Bill Barber, before getting the head honcho job.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Jun 29, 2009, at 3:29 PM

The used car lot mentioned in the original post (where the T-G parking lot now is) was owned in the 50's and 60's by Toby Palmer ("Try Toby's Terrific Trades"), a well-known UT football player under General Neyland and father of Edwin Palmer. Along with selling used cars, at one time or another Toby sold new Fiat 500's and the original BMW 2002.

-- Posted by w00dy on Mon, Jun 29, 2009, at 11:13 PM

Oh, and I gotta ask - how many remember Hootie Mae's ah, "house", near the then-triangular intersection of Depot Street and Coney Island Road???

-- Posted by w00dy on Mon, Jun 29, 2009, at 11:23 PM

ilikeoldsongs, you truly paint a stunning visual. I can almost see them now in my mind.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Jun 30, 2009, at 11:45 AM

Back in the 1950's, on the Murfreesboro hwy.,there was a small feed mill located at the corner of Decatur St.(the last street into the Robinson Addition, if going North)and the M'boro hwy. This was just a little way back toward town from Mrs. Kate Parker's store. It has long been closed, and has been remodeled into a dwelling.

I have tried forever it seems, to remember the name of that mill with no luck. Any help out there, please?

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Tue, Jun 30, 2009, at 1:42 PM

ilikeoldsongs, I remember that mill very well. I have tried to visualize a jeep pick-up truck there but I can not see a name on the door of the truck. Sorry, but I will keep thinking. It is possible that Al Simmons could tell us since that would be his area of town.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Jun 30, 2009, at 3:29 PM

Well, Ive pestered you good folks enough for one day, so I am going to get out of here and let you all rest. Before I go though, I would like to throw out a three part trivia question that will probably stump most of you, unless you have specific work experience, and in that case you will probably be able to jump on this like a duck on a Junebug.

(1)In 1962, who was the golf pro at the city golf course on West Lane St.?

(2)What was his wife's name?

(3)What was his wife's job description?

Good luck.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Tue, Jun 30, 2009, at 6:23 PM

ilikeoldsongs, wow, you have stumped me with this one. I remember the old golf course well as being just past Sam Moore's store, but I can not come up with an answer to your question. First of all, in 1962 I am not sure that club golf pro was a term that was familiar to me. I have tried to connect several names such as Spider Sexton, Rudy Kindig, Eddie Huffman, Austin Davis, and others, but none of them seem to work for me. I even tried to find a clue in your post which would have been June Bug Carroll, but I am not sure that June was a golfer. He did the mowing as best as I can remember.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 2, 2009, at 10:41 AM

leeiii, that is some pretty deep thinking on your part, breaking down the old Junebug saying, but I'm afraid, although flattered, that you may be ascribing to me a level of creativity that I don't possess!

Actually leeii, golf was not a thing that I was concerned with, in those days or since. I tried golfing one time with a brother-in law,probably around the mid 60's, and we played 9 holes, should have been a par 36. If you don't count the first three times I swung and just rolled the ball about ten feet each time, I shot a 53 and decided that any future joy I might extract from the game would pale in the face of the effort required on my part to achieve it.

But about this question, don't feel bad about not being able to come up with the answer right off. If I was going to guess at how many people are alive and able to answer this question, I would guess fewer than 100. You almost had to be working at a specific place at a certain time, or as in my case, have a wife or other relative working there, to know the answer.

I believe there is one person, if I have figuered them out correctly, that posts here, who might be able to answer correctly.

I believe that hard work should be rewarded, and so I will offer a clue before long, if no answer is forthcoming.

By the way, that's a fine group of people you listed.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Thu, Jul 2, 2009, at 11:23 AM

Sounds like your attempt at golf was about like mine. I never did try it long enough to be able to break 100.

I will be looking forward to the possibility of an upcoming clue.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 2, 2009, at 11:45 AM

"I will be looking forward to the possibility of an upcoming clue."

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 2, 2009, at 11:45 AM

Clue #1 - Play around with Rudy Kindig's name a little, and you will probably come up with the last name of the golf pro.

Clue #2 - Go to the front page of today's T-G and click on the featured story by Mary Reeves. Read my comment at the end of the article.

Clue #3 - I probably just gave away the whole store.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Thu, Jul 2, 2009, at 12:52 PM

No, Sorry. I think that either my "old timers disease" has just kicked in or I have seriously strained my brain. Oh well, back to the recliner to see if I can recuperate.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 2, 2009, at 1:22 PM

"No, Sorry. I think that either my "old timers disease" has just kicked in or I have seriously strained my brain. Oh well, back to the recliner to see if I can recuperate."

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 2, 2009, at 1:22 PM

The longer this goes on, the sillier this question seems, so I'm going to provide the answer now so that I can get you back to work on something of more substance, if that's alright with you.

1)In 1962, who was the golf pro at the city golf course on West Lane St.? John King.

(2)What was his wife's name? Bertha King.

(3)What was his wife's job description? Director Of Nursing, Bedford County General Hospital.

I don't remember how long Bertha held that position, but it was several years. I had to awaken her at 2 A.M. by phone when I came home from Germany, to clear "extracting" my wife, who was working 11 to 7 shift that night.My wife and I both thought highly of Bertha.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Thu, Jul 2, 2009, at 2:26 PM

It all makes sense now, but I never would have gotten one of the answers much less all three of them.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 2, 2009, at 2:42 PM

ilikeoldsongs, I remember that mill very well. I have tried to visualize a jeep pick-up truck there but I can not see a name on the door of the truck. Sorry, but I will keep thinking. It is possible that Al Simmons could tell us since that would be his area of town.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Jun 30, 2009, at 3:29 PM

leeiii, we got a nice rain here last night, and some of the dirt on that door got washed off, and the name looks a lot like Ferrell's. Think that will do it, or should I wait on another rain?

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 7:34 AM

ilikeoldsongs, Ferrell seems to be a good fit. However, the rain did not wash off the driver's window well enough that I could get a good look at the driver.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 8:09 AM

ilikeoldsongs, Ferrell seems to be a good fit. However, the rain did not wash off the driver's window well enough that I could get a good look at the driver.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 8:09 AM

Must be a reflection of some sort, Thursday is the driver's day off.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 8:37 AM

Sometime between 1960-1968 there was fairly briefly, a used car lot located just across the old river bridge, on the right, on Cannon Blvd. I can not narrow this down in my mind any closer than this 8 year span, because I associate it with the elections of 1960-1964. But in which 4 year span was it there? I tend to lean toward 1964-1968, but have nothing whatsoever to base that on.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 9:24 AM

ilikeoldsongs, I lived on that side of the river briefly in the early '60s. I should be able to remember that car lot but it escapes me at the moment. I can remember C.A. Woods Plumbing being in that area as well as a small barber shop. I am thinking that Roy Moon ran it. I can remember being in there one day when a young Cassius Clay was fighting someone and it was on television. That was in the days before a lot of people changed their names. Speaking of name changes, I used to work for a man named Charles T. "Doc" Jones. One time he told me that everybody in the world used to be named Jones. As they got into cattle rustling among other criminal activities they started changing their names and that is how we all wound up with different names. What was I talking about? Oh yeah, Woods, Barber Shop, and there was a farmers supply (maybe Co-Op), Clayton and Otis Arnold's Texaco. What was in the building where Sav-A-Lot is today?

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 2:00 PM

ilikeoldsongs, I am surprised that we have been able to talk this many weeks about "Picturing the Past" without someone mentioning the "doorshaker". He was a fixture downtown. I wonder how many people remember him. Arthur Crews was his name and he was the Father of J.R. (who is one of our celebrities).

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 3:01 PM

What was in the building where Sav-A-Lot is today?

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 2:00 PM

Gaseous Cassius, The Louisville Lip. One of the best quotes I ever heard was after the Clay-Liston fight, the one when Liston quit, and would'nt come out of his corner. A reporter asked Rocky Marciano, who had retired already, if he could have beat Clay when he, Marciano, was in his prime. Without batting an eye Rocky said "If I said I could you'd say I was lying, if I said I couldn't I would be".

I'm wanting to think that some kind of clothing store was in the sav-a-lot location to begin with, but I'm not sure at all.

If I remember correctly, "Doc" Jones was a plumber, unless I'm thinking about some other "Doc".

During that time frame you probably rubbed elbow's with the likes of A.C."Pat" Melson, Cecil Melton,Grady Cromwell and other assorted craftsmen and contractors.

There is a house near Pleasant Grove which contains one brick laid by yours truly, under the watchful eye of Grady Cromwell. I was working at Shelbyville Lumber Co., at the time, and made a delivery there. I asked Grady when he was going to show me how to lay bricks, and was told to get my young posterior up on the scaffold. That was Grady.

That car lot was there for such a short time that I doubt many folks will remember it. I don't remember what the name of it was, although I think I know who owned it.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 3:25 PM

ilikeoldsongs, I am surprised that we have been able to talk this many weeks about "Picturing the Past" without someone mentioning the "doorshaker". He was a fixture downtown. I wonder how many people remember him. Arthur Crews was his name and he was the Father of J.R. (who is one of our celebrities).

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 3:01 PM

Yes, I have seen him making the rounds many times.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 3:30 PM

ilikeoldsongs, Yes you are right about Doc being in the plumbing business but it was a combination of plumbing, electrical, septic tank cleaning, air compressor work, and dynamite work. I shot the hole for the flagpole at the new post office. I do not know if you are aware of it or not but that area of North Main is solid limestone. When we put the sewer line for the new (at that time) Goodyear store it was solid limestone. And yes you are right that I rubbed elbows with all three of those fellows.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 3:39 PM

Arthur Crews was his name and he was the Father of J.R. (who is one of our celebrities).

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 3:01 PM

leeii, you are aware that J. R. passed away back in 2006, aren't you?

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 3:58 PM

ilikeoldsongs, Yes I saw it in the T-G.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Jul 16, 2009, at 5:03 PM

A Mrs. Delk had a beauty shop in her home on corner of Atkinson an W. Lane St.

Jobe's Grocery store was across from E. Side School.

Lyons Jewerly Store, Studio of Charm (beauty Shop), and Carolyn's Dress Shop were next to Princess theater.

Kitty's Beauty shop was on North side of sq. and there had been a Dixie Beauty shop owned by Mrs. Russell Bryant Sr.

Mr Edwards store was between King and Hoover Sts. It was a White block building with steps.

-- Posted by Wilderness 68 on Fri, Jul 17, 2009, at 8:11 PM

Sevier St. was right beside Red Ace on Elm. C. J. Clanton started his first coal business on this street.

Coy Adams had the Stove Foundry on Fayettville Hy. The stove brand was Econmaster, It was a small electric space heater.

Red Ace, Elam appliance store, Raymond Tucker Candy Co. ,and Lois and Buck Claxton had a furniture store in Mr. Earnhart's long building, on Elm.

-- Posted by Wilderness 68 on Fri, Jul 17, 2009, at 8:24 PM

Wilderness 68, welcome to the blog. You have answered a lot of questions that we had. Yes, that is the location of Hattie Delk's beauty parlor. I never could exactly pinpoint the location. Now that you mention it I remember Mr. Edwards having a store in that building. Later Smitty's Recappers was in that building. By the way, is Vasco Edwards the father of our former Sheriff Don Edwards? If so then he later had a store in the same block of buildings as Renegar's Drug Store and Dr. Frierson on Madison just across the street from Robert Brown's appliance repair.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Jul 17, 2009, at 8:39 PM

Wilderness 68, do you ever remember a mattress factory being on Bridge Street? And if you do, do you remember who ran it? It may have been the same building that was later to become Landers Quality Recappers, or at least in the same vicinity.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Jul 17, 2009, at 8:52 PM

Wilderness 68,lots of excellent information, thanks. Do you by any chance have the date the stove foundry burned?

leeiii, yes, Vasco is Don's Dad.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Fri, Jul 17, 2009, at 10:44 PM

marnold1118, I got a passel of questions for you and those phone books (told you they'd get you in trouble).

(1)Could you confirm (or shoot down)my thinking that Dr. (R.L.?)Suggs, the colored dentist, lived at 1207 North Main St.?

(2) Leonard Parsons had a business on N.Main St., I think beside J.B. Cook. I know he had a wrecker service there, but for the life of me , I can't remember what his main business was, garage, service station, auto sales. I'm just drawing a blank on that. This would have been in the mid to late 1950's. In 1961 the bus station was located there, as I caught a bus to Nashville at that location.

(3)On page 232 of the T-G 1969 book, there is a picture of two guys in a boat, in the middle of N. Main St., with the square in the distant background. In the distance, on the right side, is a sign that begins with the letters HUD. What business was that sign advertising? This was in 1948. In an earlier post, leeiii and I discussed this sign briefly, without being able to reach a definitive conclusion.

Would greatly appreciate your effort to clarify the above, marnold1118.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Fri, Jul 24, 2009, at 1:55 PM

ilikeoldsongs, while I was looking up the 1952 Princess Theater info for another blog post, I saw a classified ad for "Hardison Motors, your Hudson dealer." I think the address was 115 W. Franklin Street.

Could the "HUD" sign in (3) above have been a Hudson sign?

-- Posted by David Melson on Fri, Jul 24, 2009, at 2:15 PM

"Could the "HUD" sign in (3) above have been a Hudson sign?"

-- Posted by David Melson on Fri, Jul 24, 2009, at 2:15 PM

This is what leeiii and I were trying to figure out, and given the fact that we now know there was a Hudson dealer here about four years after the '48 flood, I think the odds just became prohibitive in favor of that sign being a Hudson Dealership sign.

I don't imagine that any of the old Hudson's with the "step down design" survived long enough for you to ever see one did they?

A gentleman at our church bought one of the first ones, either '47 or '48, don't remember now, but I remember riding in it a time or two, felt kind of odd stepping down inside the frame, as opposed to other vehicles which were built on top of the frame.

Thanks for the info, David.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Fri, Jul 24, 2009, at 3:14 PM

ilikeoldsongs, If you do not mind me butting in on your question to marnold1118, yes Leonard Parsons had a Sinclair Service Station at that location, and they also did some garage work there. He had a mechanic named Joe with one leg. He had an above the knee prothesis. My Dad and his partner had the Gulf Station next door to Leonard Parsons.

If you were a car wash boy you should try to whisk broom one of those old Hudsons out if you did not have a vacuum, and I did not. Do not forget that the Hudson Hornet was a fireball on the NASCAR circuit in the late '40s and early '50s.

David, thanks for that information about the HUD sign. It seems to me as if Hardison and Enochs kind of go together. I am not sure if one worked for the other or if they were partners at one time, or if one bought the other out. The two names together just sounds awfully familiar.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Jul 24, 2009, at 3:30 PM

Hey leeiii, don't ever hesitate to jump into anything I put on these blogs, I always look forward to your input, and more often than not, defer to your memory of places and situations.

Boy, I can imagine it was a challenge trying to sweep out those vehicles, and that had never crossed my mind before.

Speaking of car washing, I know you remember "Elroy", probably the most famous car wash man in the world, or tennessee, or Shelbyville. I can't remember his last name for sure, seems like maybe Adams, but I don't know.

If I was a betting man, I'd bet you know his last name. Do I win?.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Fri, Jul 24, 2009, at 4:11 PM

Yes, Elroy worked for my Dad for a while and I worked with him. You are right that he was one of the best. Among my pictures I believe that I have a picture of him somewhere. I should know his last name but it escapes me at the moment, as a lot of things do. You may be right about Adams, but I am just having a hard time putting Elroy and Adams together for some reason.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Jul 24, 2009, at 4:57 PM

ilikeoldsongs, I misspoke earlier. The man I am thinking of was named Alex instead of Elroy, however Elroy still sounds familiar to me.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Jul 24, 2009, at 6:38 PM

ilikeoldsongs, you asked if I've ever seen a "step-down" Hudson. I have -- at one of the antique car shows they have here during the summers. Nice looking cars.

So how did they drive compared to other cars of their time?

As far as the Enochs-Hardison connection, I thought David Enochs owned Dixie Motors years ago in its Studebaker days, which the Hardisons operated as a Nissan dealer in the 1980s. Did they buy Dixie from Enochs at some point?

-- Posted by David Melson on Fri, Jul 24, 2009, at 6:52 PM

So how did they drive compared to other cars of their time?

Posted by David Melson on Fri, Jul 24, 2009, at 6:52 PM

I was too young to drive at the time, but now as far as the "ride" is concerned, Viva La Difference, (or something like that). Like a rubber tired buggy vs. a farm wagon (and yes, I speak from personal experience in that regard).

Who owned what business is not an area in which I would anticipate scoring very well if taking a test on the subject. But having said that, I am in agreement with leeiii that the names Enochs and Hardison seem to fit together perfectly in my mind, in fact thinking of either name calls up the other.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Fri, Jul 24, 2009, at 7:22 PM

We probably need to call in an expert like Gene Cunningham or Garland King on this Enochs-Hardison issue. There was a time (I think in the mid '50s to early '60s) when there was a lot of mergers of brands going on in the auto industry as they tried to stay afloat. Some of the brands that I remember being involved were Studebaker, Packard, Nash, and Hudson, and there may have been others. I think that Nash and Hudson eventually went to American Motors. David Enochs was right in the middle of all that. I am not sure about the involvement of Hardison. Some of the cars that I remember from those days were the Golden Hawk, Silver Hawk, Avanti, President, Clipper, and Lark to name a few. I hope that I have not muddied the water up too much.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sat, Jul 25, 2009, at 7:46 AM

Elroy was Adams and his wife was May. They lived on Bird St., close to the horse show.

They were fine people and my Grand mother lived across the field from them.

They drawed water from a well in that field and so did my Grandmother.

May cleaned houses for people and was a great cook. This was late 40s early 50s.

They moved to the end house on the dead end street in front of now Smith's store on Deery St.

One night the house caught fire , May got out, but Elroy lost his life about late 60s. He was a fine musician. Thank you for reminding me of them.

-- Posted by Wilderness 68 on Sun, Aug 2, 2009, at 5:53 PM

Thanks Wilderness 68 for the information on Elroy and May. Can you possibly tell me where he worked as a car wash man? Hopefully that will help me to place him.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Aug 2, 2009, at 8:07 PM

Elroy was Adams and his wife was May.

Posted by Wilderness 68 on Sun, Aug 2, 2009, at 5:53 PM

Thanks for the info, wilderness 68. I never knew Elroy was a musician, but he was a fine carwash man, slow as molasses in wintertime, but no way was a speck of dirt going to escape his attention.

I guess the last time I saw Elroy was around 1960, nearly 50 years ago, but I still remember that perpetual smile he had on his face.

Some things, and some people, have a way of getting into our minds and just hanging around, for no particular reason except maybe to bring a smile when recalled, and for me Elroy kind of symbolizes a different,more caring world than what has evolved in the last half century. Perhaps that is why he has remained so clear in my mind.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Aug 2, 2009, at 8:51 PM

leeiii, I'm sure Elroy worked at several different places through the years, but the place that I associate him with the most is the Pure Oil station next to Joe's coal yard. He worked there for Houston Prosser in the early 50's, then worked for Bobby Sanders in the mid to late 50's, not constantly, but frequently.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Aug 2, 2009, at 9:08 PM

It seems like we have mentioned several Service Stations, Car Dealers, J. B. Cook, some mechanics, car wash men, and various subjects pertaining to cars.

I was reminded that there was later a parts house on North Main owned and operated by the Bellefant brothers, and then there was another place to find car parts. That was George Hunter's junk yard on Madison or Tullahoma Highway just past where there used to be a Steak House. It was between the Tullahoma Highway and Railroad Avenue.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Aug 3, 2009, at 6:42 PM

leeiii, are you talking about Preacher Arnold's body shop, which was where Wendy's is now on Madison and had a row of wrecked 1950s cars in the 1970s, or the junkyard about three lots to the west which is partially occupied by a garden center?

-- Posted by David Melson on Tue, Aug 4, 2009, at 10:18 AM

David, For me trying to place a location with today's structures presents a problem to me. It might be of a help for me to say that George Hunter's junk yard was directly across the highway from where the Ford Tractor dealership used to be and maybe a few feet on toward Tullahoma.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Aug 4, 2009, at 11:11 AM

leeiii, you answered the question. It's the one now occupied by the garden center.

-- Posted by David Melson on Tue, Aug 4, 2009, at 11:46 AM

David, Concerning the property we were talking about that I refer to as George Hunter's junk yard. I looked it up on Google Earth and the property is shown as a barren (sage grass) piece of land. The East border would be the creek bed and the West border would be the edge of what once upon a time was the property of B Cook. You can still see his house if you look at the photo of 826 Railroad Avenue. You can still see the drive that entered the back of the junk yard from Railroad Avenue. The Tullahoma Highway entrance would have been close to the right edge of the parking area that is shown for the car lot.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Aug 5, 2009, at 12:13 PM

Doggonnit, leeiii, you're messin' with my head again! You went and mentioned "B Cook", and my old rusty mind is now trying to recall what "Bead" Cooks real name was. I keep wanting to think that part of his name was "Cleveland", but can't recall the rest of it.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Wed, Aug 5, 2009, at 12:49 PM

ilikeoldsongs, Sorry, I can't help you with that one. I never knew anything but "B". I could help you with the product he was famous for selling though.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Aug 5, 2009, at 1:44 PM

Sorry, I can't help you with that one. I never knew anything but "B".

Posted by leeiii on Wed, Aug 5, 2009, at 1:44 PM

Don't know where I came up with "Cleveland", but then who knows where half the junk in my mind comes from.

Anyway, his real name is Crawford Henson.

That brings another couple of questions to mind. It seems that I remember him being in the appliance business in maybe the 1980's, on Deery St., just across the RR tracks from Seymour&Peck.

A second question concerns who was in that building when it was first built. I want to say it was a feed store, but that doesn't feel quite right rolling off my tongue.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Thu, Aug 6, 2009, at 8:11 AM

Wow, ilikeoldsongs, you have really rung the bell this time. Yes, now that you mention it Crawford Henson is a perfect fit. That one was way back in the recesses of my mind hidden behind something else that will be equally hard to retrieve.

I had already left Shelbyville in the '80s so I am not sure about the appliance business, however, in years past it seems like I can remember used appliances sitting in his yard on Railroad Avenue, as if he may have been scavenging parts from them.

If I am not mistaken in my remembering, I think that Bedford Cheese used that building to store whey from their cheese making process. If I remember correctly whey was used in some kind of animal feed.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Aug 6, 2009, at 8:50 AM

leeiii, you're right about the appliances in the yard, for sure, and well may be right about Bedford Cheese using the building in question, later on.

In it's early days though, I seem to vaguely recall odd shaped pieces of metal in the front of the lot, maybe some type of chute, kind of "big at the middle and bottom at the top" sort of shape.

Since this is in David's work area he may jump on this like a duck on a june bug after while and give us a complete rundown on that building's history.(In some circles this is known as load-shifting).

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Thu, Aug 6, 2009, at 10:32 AM

I'm not sure exactly which building we're talking about. If it's the old Thompson's TV building (the one which today has a large painting of a woman in a wedding dress and a Spanish-language sign), then it seems like a feed store may have been there at one point.

-- Posted by David Melson on Thu, Aug 6, 2009, at 2:15 PM

David, I am not sure I can locate it in today's world. The best way I can describe it is: If you are standing on top of the railroad tracks in the middle of Deery Street, and you are facing East, it will be the building on your right.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Aug 6, 2009, at 3:26 PM

Dead on,leeiii. David, I wasn't too clear in referencing the RR tracks, should have specified that the tracks in the area of the ice plant were those I was talking about.

There are two buildings in that area now,one is yellow with a sign that says Fomax, Formax or some kind "max", and the other is the building in question, which is a light grey(gray) and has at least one rollup door, maybe two. That's the one I think B.Cook was in.

And I could almost hear Jumpin' Bill Carlisle trying to turn over in his grave when I saw that I had misquoted a line from one of his songs. Should have been "Big at the LITTLE and bottom at the top". Sorry, Bill.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Thu, Aug 6, 2009, at 3:57 PM

Does anybody remember a hoisery store being on the West side of the square or is my imagination running away with me again. I think that it would have been between Ewing Dickerson's studio and Gunter's hardware, and I think it would have been somewhere in the 1950 timeframe.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Aug 14, 2009, at 4:26 PM

leeiii, I can't conjure up a visual image, but the term Farrar's Hoisery kind of leaped into my head for some reason.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Fri, Aug 14, 2009, at 5:57 PM

Bingo ilikeoldsongs, that is the one. It was kind of a hole in the wall store. Thanks for confirming that for me.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Aug 14, 2009, at 6:00 PM

I never met the man myself, that I can recall, but heard a lot about a "Duck" Farrar, who did a lot of fishing I think, with Eddie Huffman and Dick Dickerson. I wonder if this was the hoisery store owner.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Fri, Aug 14, 2009, at 6:22 PM

ilikeoldsongs, The name "Duck" Farrar is familiar to me but I can not tell you why it is familiar. So I can not answer that question for you.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Aug 14, 2009, at 6:43 PM

Yes, leeiii....his name was "Duck" Farrar and his wife was Beth and they ran that little bitty sock and hose store right by the Gunter Building. I sold Duck a million cups of coffee when I was a young soda jerk at Caperton's....And you're right, ilikeoldsongs, his main cronies were Eddie and Dick. I think they fished at Lake Bedford.

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Sun, Aug 16, 2009, at 11:43 PM

steadyeddie, I think that I have about figured out who you are by some of the things you have said. Let me ask you if you were the drum major at Central High?

While I am asking let me ask you about who ran the popcorn stand on the East Side of the square before Mr. Pruitt? In the back of my mind I am trying to connect the Loudermilks with the popcorn stand.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Aug 17, 2009, at 7:20 AM

leeiii....you have the memory of an elephant! Now my cover is blown. I probably went to CHS with your father.....Yes, I remember a tall lady named Mrs. Loudermilk working that stand...bag for a nickel or big box for a dime!

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Mon, Aug 17, 2009, at 10:25 AM

"And you're right, ilikeoldsongs, his main cronies were Eddie and Dick. I think they fished at Lake Bedford".

Posted by steadyeddie on Sun, Aug 16, 2009, at 11:43 PM

From what I've been told they also liked to float the Duck River, when they could find a good boat handler.

Let me compliment you on your username, it takes me way back in time, to the days of the N.Y.Yankees "big three" pitching staff of Allie Reynolds, Vic Raschi and Ed "Steady Eddie" Lopat, also known as "The Junk Man".

They had some monumental battles with the Cleveland Indians big three of Bob Lemon, Mike Garcia and Bob "Rapid Robert" Feller.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Aug 17, 2009, at 10:47 AM

steadyeddie, Thanks for making me younger than what I actually am. No, it was me that you went to school with. I was a freshman the year you were a senior.

Thanks for validating my thoughts about the Loudermilks being at that location.

I just had a comical thought. Several of us have expressed just how much we are enjoying this forum. So, I guess that we are the modern day version of the spit and whittlers that used to gather on the court house lawn on Saturdays, Livestock day, and Mule day to remember the good old days, shoot the bull, and just generally enjoy one anothers company. Let's just keep it up. As it has been said before, "Iron sharpens iron".

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Aug 17, 2009, at 10:56 AM

ilikeoldsongs, Ahh----more good memories. I can remember that Bob Feller could really bring the heat. I once had one of his baseball cards that stated he could throw over a hundred miles an hour (I guess that card made me a good bicycle spokes motor at one time or another). If I remember correctly it is said that he holds the record for the fastest recorded pitch at almost 108 miles an hour.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Aug 17, 2009, at 11:33 AM

"Spitters and Whittlers"...that's us! leeiii, I might have to get out my old Aquila to see if I can put 2 and 2 together.

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Mon, Aug 17, 2009, at 12:24 PM

steadyeddie, second page, bottom row, middle picture.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Aug 17, 2009, at 12:34 PM

Thanks...I'll be looking when I get home..Hope the page is not too yellowed with age.

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Mon, Aug 17, 2009, at 1:52 PM

leeiii.....I found you smiling in the bottom row with LOTS of hair. Wish I had some of that now for my shiny pate!...Should your "username" have given me any clue?...Lots of good kids in your class...Still not sure how you placed me....did you come to Caperton's?

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Mon, Aug 17, 2009, at 7:54 PM

steadyeddie, No there is no clue in my username unless you know my whole family. I probably have been in Capertons when you worked there but I can not be sure. I also should know the two girls who worked there about the same time but I can not recall their names. I remember that Capertons made some really good Maple Nut ice cream down in the basement, along with their other flavors. I was also a soda jerk at another drug store during my high school days. Remember those funny paper soldier type hats we wore.

The way I identified you first of all was by your username and the fact that you said you lived a few houses up North Main. I knew the Crenshaws, and the Brantleys, and the Parkers, and I was thinking that there was a family with your last name that lived somewhere up there. Also by some of the things you said it made me think that you were 3 to 5 years older than me.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Aug 17, 2009, at 9:06 PM

Wow!...Now you have brought back memories of all my North Main playmates....Carolyn Crenshaw...Janice Brantley.....Billy and Mary Lee Parker.....And yes, our Maple Nut ice cream from the basement was pretty darned good. My co-jerks were Dot, Kat, June, and later Louise came along. The guys were Kenneth and Tommy. It blows my mind to recall all those big ice cream cones I sold for a nickel.....and now they want about four bucks at Baskin-Robbins!

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Mon, Aug 17, 2009, at 9:28 PM

Another menu topper at Caperton's for me was their "hot dog sandwich". It was 3 halves of hotdog fried on the grill and served between toast. It was always a dependable lunch. steadyeddie, I'm not as good as leeiii. I haven't figured you out, but I was a relative of the Brantley's and spent considerable time playing in their backyard and the Huffman's back yard. N. Main certainly "ain't what it used to be" is it?

-- Posted by marnold1118 on Wed, Aug 19, 2009, at 4:25 PM

marnold1118, I have made hot dog sandwiches like that for most of my life. Now I am wondering if I got the idea at Caperton's. I will bet that steadyeddie has made that sandwich for me before.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Aug 19, 2009, at 5:11 PM

Wow! You guys REALLY remember our old soda fountain! To this day, I still prefer my hot dogs that way...the three grilled slices on toast or half of a hamburger bun (not a hot dog bun). And with lettuce amd mayo. All of that for 20 cents, but 25 cents if we added a slice of cheese.

75 cents would then get you a hot dog, a thick chocolate shake and a banana split. If you started with a dollar, you'd still have enough change left to see a matinee at the Bedford. Ah, the good old days.

Do y'all remember Caperton's when the soda fountain was still at the front of the store, un-airconditioned and with a hanging airplane fan sucking the hot air out the front door??

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Thu, Aug 20, 2009, at 1:08 PM

marnold1118....you mentioned playing at the Huffman's. By any chance, did you ever know two kids who were either their grandkids or their nephews? Their names were David and Dickie Hulan. They were the ones I played with at the Huffman's. They might have been much older than you. David went to Vandy....and don't know about Dickie.

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Thu, Aug 20, 2009, at 1:20 PM

steadyeddie....I'm thinking I'm a little bit younger than you, since you mentioned playing with Janice Brantley, Carolyn Crenshaw, Bill and Mary Lee Parker. I played with "Dede" Brantley, Camille Crenshaw, Bucker and Sally Dee Huffman. I don't recall David or Dickie Hulan.

-- Posted by marnold1118 on Thu, Aug 20, 2009, at 2:11 PM

marnold, Yes, and the only one steadyeddie mentioned who was actually in his age group would be Billy Parker who would actually be about a year older, but the age difference between you two guys helps us to cover more ground in our quest for local history.

Wow steadyeddie, I had forgotten about the airplane fan. Thanks for the memory, and yes I remember the soda fountain being at the front.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Aug 20, 2009, at 2:50 PM

Yep, marnold, I remember them all...Dede, Camille, Bucker and Sally D....they were all still riding their tricycles when we had graduated to our two-wheel bikes. I remember how Rat Brantley rigged up lots of bright lights in his front yard trees to keep the birds from roosting there at night.....and during the mid-day he played 15 minutes of piano music on WHAL. He could really tickle those ivories....During my lunch hour from Caperton's I would go over to Rat's drug store across the square and flirt with his soda jerk....One day word got out that some grown man (city slicker) from Nashville was walking in front of Brantley Drugs wearing short pants. I made an excuse to run over there from Caperton's to check this out. Sure enough...I saw a grown man actually wearing shorts in public for the first time in my life!

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Thu, Aug 20, 2009, at 3:44 PM

ilikeoldsongs, Back in April I asked if anyone could tell me where the Scudder building was, and you responded with "East Side of the square" but you could not remember which building. I was doing some research today and found a history of the Bedford County Library.

It said that the library was started at the N.C. & St. L. passenger depot. Second place Upstairs in Scudder building East Side Sq. Third place Room first floor in Dixie Hotel building. Fourth place Downstairs in Court House. And Fifth place today in old Post Office building. I thought this might refresh your memory if you remembered the Library being upstairs on the East Side of the Square.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Aug 26, 2009, at 4:12 PM

leeiii.....now I'm really losing it. I lived in Shelbyville until 1954 and nobody ever told me that our town had a library (except in the schools). I must have been under a rock! What year did all these libraries get started?

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Thu, Aug 27, 2009, at 9:37 PM

I thought this might refresh your memory if you remembered the Library being upstairs on the East Side of the Square.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Aug 26, 2009, at 4:12 PM

leeiii, I've been thinking off and on about all day, since seeing your post this morning, however I'm still drawing a blank on the location of the Scudder building.

How did the East side of the square, in relation to the Scudder Building, get into my mind so firmly without any supporting information to place it there? I'm not 'into" buildings, as such, I don't go 'round marvelling at architectural designs, so why is this building sitting there all alone in my mind, with no other memory attached to it?

A couple of possibilities come to mind:

The subject of a new library has been bantered around for so many years, I'm wondering if that old library location has been mentioned at some time in the distant past in the T-G, and that somehow my feeble brain retained the building location and disassociated the library information.

Another possibility, I suppose, would be that someone told me about the library being in the Scudder Building on the East side, and like above, I only retained part of the information.

I'm glad you jogged my 'membrance on this, as it had kind of been pushed over behind some of the other stuff we've been talking about lately, I'll try to get this question answered shortly for you.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Thu, Aug 27, 2009, at 10:52 PM

steadyeddie, I found an article in a newsprint type magazine published by the T-G in 1988 called "Information-Impressions of Shelbyville and Bedford County". On page 74 in an article entitled "Bedford's Public Library Had Its Beginning in 1948" it is stated that on May 1, 1948 the grand opening for the Bedford County Memorial Library was held in the unused passenger waiting room of the N.C & St.L. Railroad depot.

Goodspeed recorded in "A History of Tennessee", published in 1886, that "The Eakin Library containing over 1,000 volumes of choice literature, was founded by the widow of William S. Eakin, and from whom it takes its name."

There is little information and dates concerning a library until 1948 (just the places of residence), and then the only dates mentioned are May 1, 1948 at the depot, and then the date of opening in the old post office building on June 6, 1966. Mrs. W.P. (Argie) Cooper was very active with the American Legion in the '30s in trying to get a permanent place for a library. This is during the time she was serving as first lady while her unmarried son (Prentice) was serving as governor of Tennessee, thus the name Argie Cooper Public Library.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Aug 28, 2009, at 8:06 AM

Thanks, leeiii.....interesting library info. Too bad our grade school teachers never took us on a field trip to the N.C. and St. L...We could have covered books and trains in the same outing!

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Fri, Aug 28, 2009, at 8:24 AM

leeiii,you may have just put your finger on the source of my Scudder-East side memory. In the article you reference above concerning the library,the term "Scudder Building, East side of the square" occurs, and that is exactly the way it is placed in my mind. I don't think of the Scudder Building without the thought of "East side of the square".

The magazine, "Information-Impressions of Shelbyville and Bedford County", is the source of the info I posted a few days ago concerning the Opera House. I discovered it under a cardboard box in my garage while looking for something else. Based on the "brand new" look, it has probably been there since 1988.

I would almost bet a dollar to a doughnut that the library article in this magazine is where I picked up on the Scudder Building.

Stay tuned, more to come.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Fri, Aug 28, 2009, at 10:47 AM

ilikeoldsongs, Thanks. My copy also has that new look as well. I think that I always considered it a vehicle to sell advertising rather than real information, so I never paid much attention to it.

However, it has some snippets of real historical information throughout the pages, so we should hang on to our copies and protect them from further wear.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Aug 28, 2009, at 11:16 AM

This is not exactly a "where was it" question, more specifically, it is a "when was it" question.

I am trying to determine the approximate time frame that the city might have operated a "dump" area between Bethany Lane and Couch Lane, along the Holland Branch. This is the same Holland Branch that passed beside the previously mentioned junk yard on Madison St.

I was told that the city operated this dump at least back into the 1940's. We all know that being told something doesn't always mean it's true,so as far as the city actually having anything to do with this dump area, officially, ( and I'm almost positive that this area would have been out of the city limits, at that time) is open to debate, in my mind. What's not open to debate is the fact that the area in question was indeed used as a dump by someone, and very substantial quantities of trash were deposited there.

The reason I can be sure that trash was dumped there is because I have dug into numerous overgrown mounds of it in a quest for those brown coca cola bottles that were a prized collectible back in, I think, the 1960's or 1970's.

And I did find about three or four of those brown beauties....every dad blamed one of them broken! And believe it or not I dug out a couple of light bulbs that were unbroken, go figure.

If anyone has any information on this area I would appreciate you sharing it.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sat, Aug 29, 2009, at 9:44 AM

ilikeoldsongs, I do not guess that I have ever thought very much about a dump. The first one in my memory would be the one between Sims Road and Fishingford Pike. That one I remember only because of the two little girls who were murdered.

In my childhood every farm that had a sinkhole had their own private dump. However, I can not remember very many things qualifying to be a part of a dump. Most everything was used up. Most used tires were used for flower planters, or chicken watering troughs, or tree swings, or toys for the kids to roll around the yard. Tin cans were used to patch rusted out places. There was very little table scraps. What there was eventually wound up going to the dogs, or in the slop bucket. Egg shells were ground up and used in the garden or flower beds. Feathers were saved for the feather bed or pillows. Bones were given to the dogs. Sack string, rubber bands, inner tubes, bailing wire, rags, and other such things were saved to be used later. Any available paper was used to write something on such as a letter, or a note. Bottles and jars were saved and washed out to be used again. Ashes from the stove and fireplace went to the ash pile where the chicken scratched around and probably ate some of the bigger pieces for their craw. Cinders went on the driveway.

I guess it was kind of like recycling in a different era.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sat, Aug 29, 2009, at 10:57 AM

ilikeoldsongs....you mentioned the opera house again. Did you see the recent posting on the blog about the Princess? Sheds a bit of light on exact location, etc.

-- Posted by marnold1118 on Sun, Aug 30, 2009, at 1:02 PM

I caught that,marnold1118, appreciate the info. I believe the livery stables mentioned being in the area are also shown on the 1878 Beers Map.

By the way, are you old enough to remember when the city limits on Fairfield Pike ended at Butler St., and the Pike was a gravel road from there on to Fairfield?

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Aug 30, 2009, at 2:13 PM

Right in front of Banty (Bantam) Burns house.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Aug 30, 2009, at 3:04 PM

Right in front of Banty (Bantam) Burns house.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Aug 30, 2009, at 3:04 PM

Right as rain, leeiii. I've been banging my head against the wall trying to remember the name of Banty's son, do you recall what his name was? He was about my age, as I recall.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Aug 30, 2009, at 3:16 PM

Yes, his name was Gene. He was a schoolmate of mine, and tragically he died in a hunting accident. Gene and I along with some other young boys used to dove hunt in the field across from Banty's house before they started building houses there. Gene's sister Vaughn married William Whitman of Whitman's Bakery fame.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Aug 30, 2009, at 3:39 PM

ilikeoldsongs, Some time back you mentioned that Raymond Tucker had built a house on the Fairfield Pike. While we are talking about that area of town, I can remember one day instead of coming straight home from school like I was supposed to do, I walked with Sherman Hardin out to his house to play. When I finally did get home Mom met me at the end of the driveway with the razor strop and helped me get into the house pretty fast. That is the last time I can remember that I did not come straight home from school.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Aug 30, 2009, at 4:12 PM

When I finally did get home Mom met me at the end of the driveway with the razor strop and helped me get into the house pretty fast.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Aug 30, 2009, at 4:12 PM

Parents are usually very dialed in to our immediate needs in such situations, and probably deserved more credit than we were inclined to give them at the time.

I thought his name was Gene, but I've been wrong so much lately that I'm about to get gun shy. Our town, and county, for that matter, certainly has had it's share of tragedy through the years. Probably no more so than others, but when hit so often among family and friends it does seem that way.

There was a Hardin family that lived about 3/4 of a mile past Banty, on the right, after you top the hill above the Duck Ponds, and start down the other side. I believe there was a Brown family that lived in that area, also, though I'm not sure of the time frame that either family was there. At the foot of the hill is Brown Lane on the right, then on the left was the Drake house( A young man left the road there and struck a tree in the Drake yard, and was killed) then on the right is where Raymond Tucker built, although I think in the timeframe under discussion, the older house that was torn down would have still been standing at that site.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Aug 30, 2009, at 7:00 PM

ilikeoldsongs, Yes that is the site where the Hardin family lived. I do not know who owned that property, but much later Thomas Cartwright built a house on it. That property was loaded with hickory trees.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Aug 30, 2009, at 8:07 PM

By the way, are you old enough to remember when the city limits on Fairfield Pike ended at Butler St., and the Pike was a gravel road from there on to Fairfield?

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs

Either I'm coming up a few years short in age or a few brain cells short in memory. I was born in 1943 and we lived on Minkslide Road--which connected Fairfield Pike and Webb Hwy. As best as I can recall, Fairfield Pike was paved as far back as I can recall, probably 1950 or so. The city limits was at the top of the hill...and after you topped the hill the old Eakin house was on the left.

ilikeoldsongs: I have very fond memories of your mom and dad and the time they attended Hurricane Grove Baptist Church, further out the Pike. They were good, gentle people....what you would call the salt of the earth.

-- Posted by marnold1118 on Sun, Aug 30, 2009, at 11:27 PM

Either I'm coming up a few years short in age or a few brain cells short in memory.

Posted by marnold1118 on Sun, Aug 30, 2009, at 11:27 PM

I'm not going to buy any shortage of brain cells, because I know you better than that, but now regarding the age factor, Gabby Hayes might have described the situation to Roy Rogers by saying something like "well Roy, he's just a young whipper snapper". Seriously though, it wasn't paved before 1952 at the earliest, I'm sure, and in my feeble memory, might not have been paved till as late as 1955-56. I simply can't remember for sure, though.

The 1952 date is based on the following: In 1959 someone told Dad about a car near Bell Buckle, that wasn't being driven, and was just sitting in a garage. Turned out to be a 1952 Chevrolet, with less than 4,000 miles. The owner, an elderly lady(about 80, as I recall) had backed out of the garage and struck a post along side the driveway. This caused her to question whether she should continue driving, and she pulled the car back into the garage and gave up driving. This happened about two years before Dad was told about it, or 1957.

Dad of course purchased the car and drove it for years. But the thing that helps date the road paving is the fact that the undercarriage of the car was coated with tar, and since the 1952 model cars came out about the first of sept. 1951, it's likely that it would have been at least the following summer before the tar would have been picked up.

The later date, 1955-56, is based on the following, and far, far less certain than the earlier date: One of my cousins, in his new 1955 Mercury, lost control of the car just before reaching Kingwood Ave. while coming toward town on the Pike. He said he got into loose gravel and fought the car back and forth from one side of the road to the other before finally stopping in front of Banty Burns house, sitting cross ways in the road.

I really appreciate your kind, and I know sincere, words about my parents, and let me say that I feel the same way about your Mom and Dad.

You and I, and all the kids that grew up in that community, were extremely fortunate to be raised in an environment that fostered genuine care and trust toward one another.

When we are children, we don't think about, or have any understanding of "role models", but the influence, good or bad, is always there in front of us. I cannot think of a single instance during the years I lived in the community, of anyone doing anything that wasn't "right".

In the past I have told several people that when I needed a "second opinion" on anything that my parents were telling me, all I had to do was walk out on the front porch and look left, right or across the road. I wish that every child in America could be a part of a community such as ours was.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Aug 31, 2009, at 12:19 PM

ilikeoldsongs:

You've got me trying to match dates and events again. Regarding the paving of Fairfield Pike, I'll do so more research, but I'm really (well pretty) sure that it was paved in or by 1950. Here is my rationale. After starting to school early (as a 4-year-old) at Harts Chapel I then transferred to Bell Buckle for the second grade. That was the 1949-50 school year. As a little kid, that was unsure of whether he liked school or not, the bus driver let me stand up front by him and open the door when he stopped to pick up or let kids off. Well one morning, we were going along Fairfield in front of the Elmer Eaton farm, when the bus driver slammed on the brakes, opened the door and with one motion, threw me out the door into the ditch. The reason? There was fire and smoke coming out of the engine right in front of me. I know for sure at that time that the road was paved, at least that section of it.

-- Posted by marnold1118 on Mon, Aug 31, 2009, at 12:42 PM

I can not help you guys with the dilema of when it was paved. The best I can recall is that when I walked home with Sherman it was gravel from Bantys house on. That would have been somewhere in the neighborhood of 1948 or 1949.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Aug 31, 2009, at 12:52 PM

marnold1118,

Let me recite a couple of events related to the earlier years, in addition to the "tar" on the undercarriage.

We moved to Austin Coop's little red house on Minkslide Rd., the 24th of June, 1950. Both Minkslide and Fairfield Pike were gravel at that time.

I'm sure you know where Austin lives now, the next house on the left past the church. Let's fast forward to the next summer, 1951. The road is still gravel, and in front of Austin's present location there is a rough spot in the road, causing traffic to move close to a shallow ditch to avoid it. We go to Columbia and bring my cousin, Robert, back to spend a couple of weeks with me during summer vacation. As we approach this "rough spot", just kidding, I tell Robert to hold on, daddy always runs off the road up ahead. He never had before, but he did then! We talked about that for years.

This next "event" I'm absolutely certain about it happening, but am not so certain of the time frame in which it happened. Whatever day in August, 1952, that school started, was the day we moved up on the Pike to "Uncle Moody's" house. I caught the bus on Minkslide that morning and got off at Arnold Rd. that afternoon.

Now, here's where the uncertainty creeps in. Sometime after moving up on the Pike Dad traded a 1937 Chevrolet for A 1941 plymouth. When is very critical, because I drove down to Hurricane Grove Church in that car on a gravel road, turned around, and like a young idiot, decided I wanted to drive 50 miles an hour for the first time in my life. And I did it. It was a noisy ride. But when was it? Late '52, sometime in '53, even?

And then there is the fact that, even though I strongly believe that Dad acquired that car after we moved to the Pike, I can't say absolutely for a fact that he didn't trade for it before we left Minkslide, but I would have only been 14 at that time, and I believe I was 15 before I was allowed to drive around the neighborhood by myself.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Aug 31, 2009, at 2:21 PM

It's been a while since Madison St. received any attention, so thought I would pitch out a few tidbits to see which way the wind is blowing.

In the early 1950's, one of the nicer buildings on Madison St., at least in my opinion, was the International Harvester Building, on the corner of Madison and North Jefferson.

There seems to be an advertising phrase in the back of my mind "George Crenshaw's International Harvester". Is this correct, was IH owned by George Crenshaw? This is the only association with his name that I can recall, as I didn't know anyone by that name.

In the early 1960's, behind IH on N. Jefferson, in the area now known as "Hoodlum Alley", there was a machine shop owned by John Merrit, and he had a machinist working for him whose last name was Hardin. Don't know if he was related to leeiii's Hardin friend or not.

Back in the day N.Jefferson did not connect with E. Highland, but does today, and if you go there and hang a right toward Deery St. on your left will be BLS Body Shop location.

A few feet farther brings you to the Studebaker Restoration Shop on the corner of Highland and Deery, the former location of Robert Wakefields Handle Factory, which burned down on April 1, 1958, if my memory serves me correctly. I was working there at the time, and had only been dating my future bride for a couple of weeks, what a downer.

Across Highland, and facing Deery St. is Smith's Market., which I don't think we've discussed yet.

Coming back to Madison St. and moving East to the corner of King St. and Madison there was another machine shop, Bedford Machine, operated before his tragic death, by Alvin Palmer. I never could get my mind wrapped around that accident well enough to understand how it could have happened where it happened.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Sep 13, 2009, at 6:04 PM

International Harvester was owned by George Crenshaw and the building is still there, I think. It was across Madison St. from Edwards Market on Madison.

-- Posted by marnold1118 on Sun, Sep 13, 2009, at 8:39 PM

ilikeoldsongs.....Your mentioning Robert "Doc" Wakefield's Handle Factory brought back memories for me (circa 1950's). Can you recall the other items which Doc turned out in addition to handles?

Somewhere I probably still have a sample of his wooden toilet seats (very comfy) and his very interesting "marble chasers" for the kids....I was not aware that his factory was destroyed by fire.....Thanks for the memory.

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Sun, Sep 13, 2009, at 8:53 PM

ilikeoldsongs, Yes the IH place was owned by George Crenshaw. I think that steadyeddie had mentioned his daughter Carolyn as one of his playmates, and maybe marnold1118 had mentioned his other daughter Camille as a friend.

I remember John Merritt and his machine shop. I know that his son worked for him. I do not remember the others but I am pretty sure my friend Sherman Hardin was not one of them, however, it could have been some of his kin.

I have been meaning to stop by Smith's sometime on one of my trips to Shelbyville. I do not know if Rayburn is still alive or not. Our present day Register of Deeds got his start working at C.F. Smith's market if I am not mistaken. While we are in that area one of the bloggers had mentioned that Don Edwards was running a pawn shop in Tren Paynes old store on Derry. I need to stop by and visit him as well. Don was a buddy from school days.

I remember Bedford Machine as well. I do not know if I am not familiar with Alvin's death or if I have just forgotten.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Sep 13, 2009, at 8:54 PM

While we are talking about Madison Street it would be unforgivable if we failed to mention that when Austin Davis started the Shelbyville Record Shop it was on Madison beside the One Hour Martinizing Cleaners.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Sep 13, 2009, at 9:02 PM

The International Harvester building is still there, but looking quite different from when it was an implement dealership. Seems like I remember it had something unique on the roof, either a sign or the roof itself.

Rayburn Smith is very much alive and actively running his store.

Speaking of Madison Street, the One Hour Martinizing building still stands (and still houses cleaners); as you go east from there you'll see Hardee's, built in the 1970s, and the Edwards Interiors building, now the home of a Mexican store and restaurant.

But what was previously in the Hardee's location?

-- Posted by David Melson on Sun, Sep 13, 2009, at 10:20 PM

marnold1118 and leeiii, thanks for the confirmation on George Crenshaw. The building is still there, minus the little thingy that used to be on top about the center of the building, but like myself, it's showing it's age and mileage pretty badly.

leeiii, during the time that I worked at Wakefields, which was probably only about a couple of months as I recall, the only items we were making were knobs and "D" handles for coffee percolators. I believe that I read in the 1969 book, in the article about the Fix-It Shop, something about Wakefield making ax handles at one time, but I never saw any evidence lying around of anything like that.

And I can't for the life of me remember that Hardin fella's name, but am reasonably sure that it was not Sherman. You'd think that I would remember his name if for no other reason than the fact I asked him once if he could make me a silencer for my .22 rifle. He told me yes, but said they probably wouldn't let me take it into a federal jail so I told him to just forget it then.

I haven't been in Smith's in about a year, I guess, but Rayburn seemed hale and hearty. Of course at our age it can easily be here today, gone tomorrow. In fact, if you hear me humming a tune, more than likely it won't be "Zip-A-Dee-Do-Dah" but more along the line of "Time Don't Run Out On Me". The last time I was in Smiths, Huron Dial was working in the meat dept., so that would be an opportunity to say hello to both of them if you do stop by.

Yes, Don Edwards has had a pawn shop there for a bunch of years now. He grew up in the same neighborhood with marnold1118 and I , around a quarter mile from Hurricane Grove Church. Don was another good kid from that area.

Alvin Palmer was killed in an auto accident at what was known in the 1950's and 1960's as "Dead Man's Curve" out on the Lewisburg Highway, a title that I have no quarrel with in that time frame. However, at the time of his accident the road had been reworked to basically it's present condition. That curve was virtually eliminated, and the awful lead up to it was built up to make it just a level, gentle, slight change of direction.

As I recall it was a Porsche that he had, and his mechanic lived in lewisburg. Alvin took the car to him for a tuneup one morning, and on the way back it left the road for some reason, struck a small embankment about two thirds of the way around the curve and burned.

Well, you got me now on the Record Shop, hard as I've tried I can't visualize it there.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Sep 13, 2009, at 10:21 PM

But what was previously in the Hardee's location?

-- Posted by David Melson on Sun, Sep 13, 2009, at 10:20 PM

Wally Cartwright's family?

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Sep 13, 2009, at 11:08 PM

David, it seems to me that the symbol you are talking about on the roof was an I superimposed over a H.

Ah yes, Dead Man's Curve. You can not recognize it as being a very dangerous place in the road anymore. I still am foggy on the wreck. I think that steadyeddie may have gone to school with Alvin.

When Austin first opened the record shop he did not have any racks. The records (45's) were laid out on tables. This was probably in the mid '50s.

I can not remember exactly what was there before Hardees was built, but I know that Winston Trollinger either lived somewhere along there. His daughter Martha Gene married Wally Cartwright.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Sep 14, 2009, at 6:36 AM

leeiii, you're right about the IH sign on top of the building.

And the former "dead man's curve" is hardly worthy of being called a curve, anymore.

I knew that Wally wasn't quite right when I wrote him down. The person I was trying to get out of my mind and onto the screen was Perry Trollinger. I knew Perry, and remember being in his house one time, but can't remember why we were there. I want to think that Perry had a brother, and that at least one of them attended U.T., but I could be wrong, as I have demonstrated on more than one occassion.

While we're at Hardee's, a question about the laundromat next door, toward N.Main St. I know that J.T. Jones owned it at one time, and had his office in the other end of the building. Did J.T. build that building and install the laundromat, or purchase it as a going business?

Given the length of time that I have been a music fan,(Can you say "Walking The Floor Over You", 1941) it's embarrassing to have to admit that somehow a music store on Madison St. escaped my attention, completely, but that seems to be the case. Makes one wonder what else one might have forgotten.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Sep 14, 2009, at 9:10 AM

ilikeoldsongs, Doodle, but let me come back to him in a moment, first let me deal with J.T. Jones. Bingo, the area that became the laundromat was the very area that Austin started his record shop in. Somehow in the back of my mind it seems if someone else started the cleaners and J.T. later bought it out, but I can not be positive of that. I do know that One Hour cleaning was a relatively new thing as we moved toward "faster is better" (such as "fast food"). I never have quite caught on to the fast thing. It seems to me that slow cooking on my Grandmother's old wood stove was quite good in my memory.

Speaking of old songs like "Walking The Floor Over You", how about "Mom And Dad's Waltz".

Doodle Trollinger better known in today's circles as Dr. James Davis Trollinger. He was the one that was Perry's younger brother. It seems to me that there was an inordinately large number of boys in my graduating class who became Doctors in things like Holographics, Lasers, Aeronautical Engineering (Space Travel). People like Doodle Trollinger, Freddie Shoffner, John Shipp, Joel Muelhauser, and I may be missing a couple there. All I was trying to do was to try and get my 16 credits so I could graduate. Doodle has a web site that you should check out. It is www.worldsworsttourist.com.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Sep 14, 2009, at 10:15 AM

leeiii, I think you're right about J.T. buying that property later on, rather than building it himself, as I believe my memory of him owning it was maybe in the late 60's, early 70's time frame, now that I think about it.

You mentioned John Shipp and that takes me back to the "boy's poolroom" days. He was a pretty good pool player, used to run with Earl Calahan and a couple of others whose names escape me at the moment.

I appreciate that link to Doodle's site, have spent the last hour there, and would recommend it to others. He mentions Dale Cleek, and just happens that I was listening to WLIJ one day last week and heard on the Birthday Club that Dale had a birthday a couple of days earlier. Now the whole world can send Dale a birthday card.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Sep 14, 2009, at 1:01 PM

ilikeoldsongs, There were several of us in a group that John ran around with. Dale would have been one that I would have mentioned. Also, could have been Joe Lane, William Whitman, Sam Kennedy, or one of a dozen others including myself. Yeah, Happy Birthday Dale.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Sep 14, 2009, at 3:09 PM

The recent wartime photo and article(#23) made me remember some things about that general area of the Fayetteville Highway and Chestnut Ridge. Since they are not military related I thought this might be a more appropriate place to place them.

There was a time when just about every road in Bedford county had a toll gate to collect money for the upkeep of the road. The only two, whose locations I remember, were on Tollgate Rd. just off the Flat Creek Highway, near the Duck River Bridge, and on U.S. 231 S. across the highway from what used to be a state roadside park, then later Rich Valley Community Club,If memory serves correctly.

By the mid 50's, the toll house on 231 was pretty much caved in and covered with vines and ivy., but the house on Tollgate Rd. remained livable well into the 60's.

A little way past the Rich Valley site is Hawthorne Hill Rd. I have been told, by a lifelong resident of the Chestnut Ridge area, that at some time in the distant past, Hawthorn Hill Rd. was a part of U.S. 231. In looking at a map of the area it makes perfect sense to me that old time road builders would follow the straightest path between two points.

It has also been pointed out to me the general location of a legal liquor distillery, located about midway up the steepest incline portion of Hawthorne Hill Rd., on the left side of the road.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Sep 14, 2009, at 6:28 PM

ilikeoldsongs, Like you I remember the toll house on the Flat Creek highway mainly because the toll house stood and was usable for many years afterward. I do not think that I remember the toll house or toll gate on the Fayetville Highway. It seems to me that I can remember a reference being made to the toll gate on the Unionville Highway, and I think that I have always associated that toll gate with a space near Gowen-Smith Funeral home or Dewey Coffey's house.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Sep 14, 2009, at 6:44 PM

Does anyone have an old photo of a Bedford County toll house/road, or know where one is? I'd sure like to get a copy.

-- Posted by marnold1118 on Mon, Sep 14, 2009, at 10:10 PM

marnold I'm sure you are already aware of the info below, taken from Goodspeed's History of Bedford County, but just in case...

Bedford County is traversed by numerous turnpikes or macadamized roads, a majority of which lead to and from the county seat. The average cost of these turnpikes was $1 ,500 per mile, and toll-gates are established every five miles, by means of which the expense of construction and maintenance of the pikes is derived. The turnpikes of this county, their establishment and the number of miles of each are as follows: Shelbyville, Murfreesboro & Nashville Pike, built in 1832, 12 miles; Shelbyville & Fayetteville Pike, built in 1852, 9 miles; Shelbyville & Lewisburg Pike, built in 1856, 11 miles; Shelbyville & Unionville and Shelbyville, Richmond & Petersburg Pikes, built in 1858, 18 miles of the former and 9 of the latter; Shelbyville & Fairfield Pike, built, part in 1859 and completed in 1865, 8 miles; Shelbyville. Flat Creek & Lynchburg Pike, built in 1875, 9 miles; Shelbyville & Fishing Ford Pike, built in 1875, 5 miles; Shelbyville & Tullahoma Pike, built in 1874, 10 miles; Shelbyville & Wetumpka Pike, built in 1881, 5 miles; Shelbyville & Versailles Pike, built in 1885, 8 miles; Wartrace & Beach Grove Pike, built in 1874, 6 miles; Bell Buckle & Flatwood Pike, built in 1882, 5 miles; Bell Buckle & Beech Grove Pike, built in 1882, 6 miles, and Bell Buckle & Liberty Gap Pike, built in 1882, 5 miles.

Finding a picture of a local tollhouse/tollgate may be like hunting that proverbial needle in a haystack. However, nothing is really impossible, as long as we don't give up.

A few years ago I did see a really nice picture of an unidentified tollhouse/tollgate on the Maury Tngenweb page, or a link from that page.

But I have been scouring that page for the past hour and can't find that picture now. I thought that as a last resort you might want to use it as a "typical" photo. Will keep your request in mind.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Sep 14, 2009, at 11:27 PM

marnold1118, I will also keep that in mind as I visit various sites. Right now I can not recollect ever seeing a picture of a toll house.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Sep 15, 2009, at 6:00 AM

Does anyone have an old photo of a Bedford County toll house/road, or know where one is? I'd sure like to get a copy.

-- Posted by marnold1118 on Mon, Sep 14, 2009, at 10:10 PM

Don't ever give up the ship!

Here's that Maury County tollhouse/tollroad picture I mentioned above. Although not in Bedford County, I don't think you could find a more typical example of the period. Hope this will be of some benefit to you. There is a name and contact e-mail address with this picture, don't know how valid it would be since this picture has been up for several years.

www.tngenweb.org/maury/mystery.htm

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Tue, Sep 15, 2009, at 9:30 PM

ilikeoldsongs

Thanks for your persistence. That's a great photo and I enjoyed the others on that site as well. You are a bloodhound with this research.

-- Posted by marnold1118 on Tue, Sep 15, 2009, at 10:33 PM

ilikeoldsongs, In the information you shared about toll roads from Goodspeed's Wetumpka Pike was mentioned. Do you know right off hand where Wetumpka Pike was?

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Sep 22, 2009, at 11:39 AM

Do you know right off hand where Wetumpka Pike was?

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Sep 22, 2009, at 11:39 AM

No, along with a couple of others on that list, Wetumpka Pike is a mystery to me.

The name is Indian, and means "rumbling waters" if that is any help, perhaps indicating that a waterfall was in the vicinity, or at least the direction, that the pike was headed from Shelbyville. When you don't have a clue,take a guess.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Tue, Sep 22, 2009, at 12:27 PM

I have another "road" question that has been begging for an answer for a long time.

As those familiar with the Eakin house on Fairfield Pike know, it does not face the pike, but rather another road or lane that at one time, I'm told, connected the Fairfield Pike and Murfreesboro highway. Of course when this house was built, in 1825, the Fairfield Pike did not exist as we know it today.

Somewhere, on a newer map, which included the present day Fairfield Pike, I have seen this road represented as veering off to the left at about the top of the hill above the "duck ponds", then running straight past the front of the house. A portion of this road or lane is still there today.

Can anyone tell me if this road or lane had a formal name?

I have also been told that there was a spring along the course of this road, in the general vicinity of the rear area of the Edwin Palmer home on the Murfreesboro Rd., and that it was a favored camping area for gypsies, in years past.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Tue, Sep 22, 2009, at 1:45 PM

ilikeoldsongs, The Eakin problem is a new one to me. I will have to see what I can find out about it.

Now back to your other post about toll roads. I am guessing that the two you mentioned which are a mystery to you are Versailles Pike and Flatwoods Pike. First of all I have heard of Versailles Pike all my life. Versailles is in the Northern part of Bedford County or Southern part of Rutherford County depending on when the boundaries were made. It seems to me that Versailles Pike was always mentioned to me in connection with Longview, so my best guess is that Versailles Pike runs from 41-A North at the former Vic Thompson property through 3-cornered garden, on through Longview to Versailles. That is just a guess so do not bet the farm on it.

Flatwoods is in the Southern part of District 9, so I am guessing Bell Buckle-Flatwoods Pike ran between those two point. Could it be Bell Buckle Lane and then on across 231 North to the West? Again, just a guess.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Sep 22, 2009, at 2:15 PM

I am guessing that the two you mentioned which are a mystery to you are Versailles Pike and Flatwoods Pike.

Posted by leeiii on Tue, Sep 22, 2009, at 2:15 PM

Yep, you hit the nail on the head.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Tue, Sep 22, 2009, at 2:37 PM

A Tollgate on the Shelbyville to Unionville Pike was located on US 41A at an place called Hickory Hill just south of Old Columbia Rd...I can remember an old building on the west side of the road they said was the Toll House....

-- Posted by FlaDon on Tue, Sep 22, 2009, at 9:21 PM

FlaDon, I know the area you are talking about and it seems to me that I can remember a wood clapboard building being in that location but I did not connect a toll gate with it. In the information ilikeoldsongs posted from Goodspeed's History of Bedford County it said that toll gates were constructed every 5 miles so that would be a logical location. It was 13 miles from my house on Whitthorne to the North Fork Baptist Church.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Sep 23, 2009, at 6:51 AM

Yes, leeiii and FlaDon....I remember that old building y'all are talking about sitting near the roadway just about halfway to DoLittle. I believe that was called the Hickory Hill area. Seems like the old toll building was operated as a general store in the 40's and 50's.

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Wed, Sep 23, 2009, at 11:03 AM

steadyeddie, the old general store that I remember was a little closer back to town at Fall Creek just across the road from the Fall Creek one room schoolhouse. That old store was operated at various times by Mr. Sam Osburne, Mr. Lee Sudberry, and my Uncle Harvey Claxton. Mr. Lee Sudberry later built a new store a little closer to Hickory Hill and built a house across the highway from it.

That old store was a community gathering place that every year on the Saturday Night before Easter had a big egg roast. You could scare up a Rook game or a game of Checkers most any time that it was too wet to plow. Good memories, and oh yes a Dr. Pepper at 10, 2, and 4 in the small bottles.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Sep 23, 2009, at 11:59 AM

leeiii....I do remember my grandmother calling that building Osburne's Store. Now, the only Sudberry store I remember was Calvin Sudberry's store right on the highway in DoLittle.(It may be still there). Do you know if he and Lee were the same family?...Yes..had those Peppers at 10, 2, and 4....and maybe a Grapette a little later.

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Wed, Sep 23, 2009, at 12:49 PM

steadyeddie, Yes I remember Calvin Sudberry's store in Dolittle. My Great Grandfather is buried at the Methodist Church Cemetery in Dolittle. I visited his gravesite a few years back but I do not remember paying too much attention to the store buildings there. I am almost certain that Lee and Calvin were kin but I am not sure how close. It seems like all Sudberrys in that area were kin.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Sep 23, 2009, at 1:09 PM

Yes, and at one time I believe the Grapette was in an even smaller bottle (maybe a 4 or 4 1/2 oz. bottle).

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Sep 23, 2009, at 1:18 PM

ilikeoldsongs, I have been looking at Google Earth trying to get a sense of what you are looking for in relation to the Eakin house. First of all I am not familiar with the Eakin house in that area so I used your description of forking off to the left just above the duck pond as a reference point on one end and the branch behind the Edwin Palmer house as a reference point on the other end. It makes it hard when you try to discount Fairfield Pike as not being there at the time, because I always use Fairfield Pike as a reference.

However, I did find this. The branch is very clear behind the Palmer house even with some greenery that is normal along a stream of water. The only problem is that it runs into a pond or catch basin of some sort behind Dr. Derryberry's house and all signs of the stream end at that point.

Sorry that I could not be of a help on this one.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Sep 23, 2009, at 1:31 PM

Sorry that I could not be of a help on this one.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Sep 23, 2009, at 1:31 PM

Hey, no biggie, don't sweat the small stuff.

Being as young as you were when you went "visiting" your friend, young mr. Hardin, you might not have paid a lot of attention to your surroundings, but if you had looked across Fairfield Pike from his house you would have seen a two story house, about a hundred yards off the road. This was the Eakin house in question. There was also a driveway to this house that was located almost in front of the Hardin home.

There is a possibility that this lane is shown on the 1878 Beers map. There is a broken line, located very near to this lane's present location, that connects the Pike with Murfreesboro Highway. The angle, (slightly NW) appears to coincide perfectly with the present situation.

I can't make out the various explanations of symbols that should be on the map, so I can't be sure what a broken line would indicate, but am wondering if it might refer to the type of road surface or even indicate a privately maintained road.

If you want to locate this house and road just zero in on either 311 or 313 Chestnut Drive 37160, then look directly behind these houses, across a field to a row of trees. The lane in question is between the double rows of trees, which begin at an opening at about half way from the Pike to the house.

Look across this tree line and there will be a neat looking rectangle which contains the ruins of the old house, which now appears to be completely down. When I was there about 5 years ago, a good portion of 3 walls was still standing, though too dangerous to get close to with my metal detector for fear that they might collapse.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Wed, Sep 23, 2009, at 5:13 PM

Check out this location with the aerial photo on bing.com maps and you'll get a much closer, more focused view than on Google Earth. You'll see a white truck in the middle of the rectangle.

-- Posted by David Melson on Wed, Sep 23, 2009, at 5:34 PM

David, Thanks for the link. I love it.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Sep 23, 2009, at 6:36 PM

ilikeoldsongs, Thanks for the info. I had looked at that area before and wondered if that was the place mainly because of the partial unnamed lane running off Fairfield Pike up to the place of the former house. It is interesting to follow the lane all the way over to Eakin Hill just South of Wally World. I can now get a little bit better understanding of how the stream or branch used to run as well.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Sep 23, 2009, at 6:57 PM

Back in August somebody remembered playing with David and Dick (once know as Dickie) Hulan. They were preacher's kids from somewhere else, visiting aunts and uncles (and grandparents) on both sides in Shelbyville. Just wanted to mention that we are alive and well, and live in Illinois and Virginia, respectively.

Also thanks to Ilikeoldsongs for the link to the great Maury Co. tollgate photo. I've been doing a little research about those, one of our female ancestors was a gatekeeper in Davidson Co. in the 1850s.

Elroy Adams played mandolin and guitar very well. I taped him in the 1960s, and I believe I deposited the tapes in the Archives of American Folksong (now part of the American Folklife Center) at the Library of Congress. He lived next to Elbert F. "Uncle Pete" Pilkington, an old time banjo player who got some attention from the Nashville media. I think the TV reporter's name was Huell Howser -- I may have the spelling of either name wrong, but it sounded like that.

-- Posted by razyn on Fri, Dec 11, 2009, at 11:14 PM

My brother pointed this blog out to me as having our names mentioned back in August by steadyeddie, whom I remember well, and it brought back old memories. We did actually live in Shelbyville for the greater part of a year in 1945-46 when our father was a chaplain in the Navy; I spent most of my 4th grade year in Madison Street School, Mrs. Shaw's class. We lived with our Huffman grandparents on North Main. We visited regularly as long as any of our grandparents were still living, and occasionally as long as my parents were still living (they lived in Murfreesboro the last couple of decades, but visits there usually included at least one trip to Shelbyville).

-- Posted by davidnoe on Sat, Dec 12, 2009, at 10:00 AM

razyn, I do not think that I remember either you or David, however, in your post you mentioned that Elroy lived next door to "Uncle Pete" Pilkington. "Uncle Pete" is the Father of my Wife's step-Father, and "Uncle Pete's" Great Grandson still has his old banjo

-- Posted by leeiii on Sat, Dec 12, 2009, at 3:08 PM

I bought one broken banjo from Uncle Pete, still have it. I learned a few of his songs, and one or two from his aunt Becky Dye. Also have a few hours of tape recordings of him, and her. He was quite a story teller. Mostly not about Shelbyville, but about Lascassas, and central Texas (other places in which he had lived, or had adventures). In case this is still supposed to be about roads, he and Elroy lived just off Fairfield Pike.

My first grade teacher at Madison Street school was called Miz Huffman -- at school. When I went home, the grownups called her Cud'n Rita.

-- Posted by razyn on Sat, Dec 12, 2009, at 3:52 PM

razyn, I sure would like to communicate with you. You have my permission to ask David Melson for my e-mail address, and I will be glad to give him permission to give it to you if you would like to communicate with me. It really would be nice to have some of his music to keep.

I believe that the name of the street "Uncle Pete" lived on was Boston Street.

Miz Huffman was also my First Grade Teacher, Miz Haynes was second, Miz Dean was third, and Miz Epps was fifth. I can not remember the name of my Fourth Grade Teacher. She must not have made an impression on me.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sat, Dec 12, 2009, at 4:07 PM

I sent David Melson an email, don't know if I phrased it correctly; anyway I'd be glad to correspond with leeiii about Uncle Pete, or with other Bedford Countians who want to discuss local history, family history, folklore and such.

Are y'all generally aware that the TN state folklorist (Robert Cogswell) is another preacher's kid who grew up in Shelbyville? I was born there, but grew up wherever my dad was called to preach. Roby is in some ways more of a native than I am -- but several years younger.

-- Posted by razyn on Mon, Dec 14, 2009, at 8:20 AM

razyn, I will be glad to hear from you. I have a picture that I can share with you of Uncle Pete that was made in his later days. We are also involved in Geneology and I looked up Aunt Becky and we do indeed have her in our data base but the information is scarce, such as siblings, birth dates, death dates, etc.

I remember when the Cogswells were in Shelbyville, but I do not think that I knew them. If my memory serves me correctly, I think that the Father was the Pastor of First Presbyterian.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Dec 14, 2009, at 8:27 AM

does anyone know what those 2 buildings were that are close to the pawn brokers the one looks like a dome or something with the half cricle shaped roof and also the tower looking building what was that area some kind of train place or something?

-- Posted by ipledgeallegiancetotheCSA on Tue, Dec 15, 2009, at 12:08 PM

I would need to know where the pawn brokers is, such as what street or streets.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Dec 15, 2009, at 12:15 PM

Does anyone remember that at the wide intersection of Depot and Deery was a small gasoline station (Spur,I think)that gave tokens that you could redeem for dinnerware. I believe it was on the outer edge of the railroad yards.An Esso Station was in the split between Belmont and Wartrace Pike and a small restaurant behind it named The Hut?

-- Posted by LarLMoore on Tue, Dec 15, 2009, at 4:52 PM

I remember Floyd's Service Station (I think you are right about Spur), and I remember Roy Stallings' Esso station, but I do not remember the Hut.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Dec 15, 2009, at 5:17 PM

For LEWIS_ITSUB, I think you're talking about an area between Thompson and Depot Streets. If so, that used to be the Dixie Grain Co. complex.

-- Posted by David Melson on Tue, Dec 15, 2009, at 11:36 PM

David I had wondered if that was the buildings that LEWIS_ITSUB was talking about. The quonset hut type building would have been the chicken hatchery, and the tower type building would have been where the elevator was housed with both buildings belonging to Dixie Grain. I still do not know where the pawn brokers is.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Dec 16, 2009, at 6:34 AM

Pawnbrokers of Shelbyville is on Thompson Street.

-- Posted by David Melson on Wed, Dec 16, 2009, at 7:52 AM

davidnoe and razyn....Could y'all really be my long lost play-buddies from down at the Huffman's house? REAL long time no see...My short term memory is terrible but I can recall really old stuff like.....one of you carried around a very old beat up Teddy bear with a missing eye....and one of you read Tarzan books all the time. I belive davidnoe might have been at Vandy when I was ...but we lost touch. I really went on a memory trip when some of you mentioned your teachers at Madison Street. Mine were 1st Mrs. Young, 2nd Miss Haynes, 3rd Mrs. Parker, 4th Mrs. Shaw, 5th Mrs. Farrar and 6th Miss Burrow.....then we went next door for 7th Mrs. Hutson, then finished with 8th Mrs. Clark. How come none of our teachers were blonde, trim and sexy looking like today's variety??

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Wed, Dec 16, 2009, at 1:03 PM

Steadyeddie - Yup, it's us. Dick was the one with the teddy bear; it was beat up enough, but not actually old, since he got it when we moved to Virginia Beach in October 1944 and the time you'd be remembering him from (if he was still carrying the bear a lot) would have been most likely the summer of 1945, or at most the following fall and winter. And yeah, I read Tarzan books all the time, except when I was reading Oz books...and I still reread both between going to bed and going to sleep many nights. I remember Mrs. Parker now that you mention it from the few days I attended Madison Street in third grade, but because they knew I'd be leaving town for Virginia in October I was transferred to East Side school for the rest of the first six weeks of third.

I sort of vaguely remember your being at Vandy when I was, but I don't think we moved in the same circles or were in any of the same classes. As for the teachers, I suspect some of them were probably what we'd think of as trim and sexy if we saw them now, but when you're a kid a 30-year-old is Old. (Though as I recall Mrs. Parker and Mrs. Shaw wouldn't have fallen into that category.)

-- Posted by davidnoe on Wed, Dec 16, 2009, at 2:16 PM

steadyeddie and davidnoe, You do know that you can get forgiveness for matriculating into Vandy don't you? GO VOLS!

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Dec 16, 2009, at 2:53 PM

I don't read Tarzan and Oz books. When I became a man, I put away childish things... to coin a phrase. Technically, I do still have that bear, but I no longer carry it around. (I PUT it away; I didn't THROW it away.)

David, on the other hand, also wrote an Oz book. There's currently at least one copy on eBay (The Glass Cat of Oz). I also write for print, but usually about historical topics. And I got three degrees from Vanderbilt. They always said David was the smart one.

Speaking of the actual subject here -- I was looking at some 1940s photos I have, taken in the yard of the J.E. Huffman place at 734 North Main (before it was severely remodeled). I can see the Brantley house on the north side, and the one next door (was it Townes?) on the south. And part of the Huffmans' wraparound porch. Does anybody have a photo showing that whole house when it was still a Victorian, with a bay window, etc.? There wasn't one in that Doors into the Past book, about old Bedford County homes.

-- Posted by razyn on Wed, Dec 16, 2009, at 4:52 PM

davidnoe and razyn....what a pleasure to hear from both of you guys! And I can rest easier now that I know the bear and the Tarzan collection are still in safe hands. Please let me know if you ever decide to put them on e-bay. Vandy should not have any worries now with a steady revenue stream from BOTH of you. Keep it up!

And now a word for leeiii. For the next few weeks, let's move both the Dores and the Vols to the back burner and shout together..GEAUX SAINTS!

Who dat?

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Thu, Dec 17, 2009, at 1:15 AM

steadyeddie, Agreed except for the fact that I may need to cheer for one of your homeboys that is QB for another unbeaten.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Dec 17, 2009, at 6:13 AM

Now that Da Bears are eliminated from anything I'm rooting for both the Saints and the Colts to remain unbeaten till they meet in the Super Bowl. At that point, though, I'm afraid I'll be for the Colts, mostly because I get to see them quite a bit (and they're a fun team to watch), probably 6-8 times a year whereas I see the Saints maybe 2-3. (Because a lot of Indiana is in the Chicago TV market.)

Back on topic, I was reflecting on the east side of North Main street back during the time we lived at the Huffman house during The War - there were a lot of kids along there in those days. I think it was the second house north of Madison where Johnny Ross lived, I think with his grandmother. He was about Dick's age. Then at 724, one or two houses up from where he lived, a family named Flowers rented - Tommy was about my age, Charlie about Dick's, and there were at least two and maybe three other younger boys. Later on my Huffman grandparents bought and remodeled that house and lived there from about 1949 until my grandmother died in 1960. Then the next house north was where the Crenshaws lived; I'm not sure Camille had even been born at that point, but if so she was at most a toddler. Then the Towns' (or Townes' - not sure how they spelled it) house, then 734 where we were living (and our Uncle Ed and his kids lived subsequently), then the Brantley place; again, I don't know if Dede was born yet but if so she was a toddler. I think Clark and Ruby Robinson lived in the next house, and then I'm not sure; I know the Hoovers and Parkers lived not far up the street but don't recall just how many other houses there might have been in that stretch. Anyhow, quite a few kids in the 6-10 year old bracket on that street in 1944-46.

-- Posted by davidnoe on Thu, Dec 17, 2009, at 10:50 AM

davidnoe, I recognize several of the names that you mentioned, especially the Townes, however in the time frame of 1944-46 my world did not extend very far past East Lane Street, and Whitthorne Street. Let me ask you a question. Do you ever remember John C. Huffman having an appliance store? If you do is there a possibility that you can remember the location of it?

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Dec 17, 2009, at 1:57 PM

Seems to me Cud'n John Huffman's appliance store was in the first block of N. Main off the square, east side of the street, across from the Dixie Hotel. Or around there somewhere.

Speaking of East Lane, leeiii, my other grandparents lived out there (east side of Park Place -- I think). And I'm tempted to tell an early 20th century Prentice Cooper story... wonder if that would get Congress involved?

Back on June 29 "Eddie Huffman's big black building," where Deery crosses the tracks, was mentioned. I believe that was the former Shelbyville Harness Company, incorporated in 1909. I think my grandfather Hulan leased the building from my grandfather Huffman. It was a warehouse, most of the time. My dad remembered its having been full of automobiles (Fords?) awaiting final assembly by the dealers. The floor beams were, and I think still are, huge timbers.

Also from June 29 -- the Culligan soft water franchise business was originally a partnership of E.W. "Bill" Estes and Lamar Hazlett, whose wife was Bill's sister. I assume that others held the franchise later.

-- Posted by razyn on Thu, Dec 17, 2009, at 3:05 PM

razyn, Thanks for clearing the Huffman Appliance store thing up for me. I can not tell you why but I had always associated his store with the corner of West Holland and North Spring (location of Fred Phillips store). My Dad and Mom bought a refrigerator (Frigidaire) from him sometime after they married in 1934.

I think that I remember the house on East Lane well. As I remember it, it had a drive through carport on the left side of the house and instead of having a concrete driveway, they had two strips of concrete with grass in between.

As far as Prentice Cooper goes, back on November 3 one of his boys responded to Nathan Evans blog titled Who Has the Answer. I do not know which one it was but they used the user name of zzoop.

That is exactly the way I remember the big black building but I never knew about the automobiles being stored there.

I do not believe that I ever knew who was associated with the Culligan business except that I knew they did a big business with people who had wells.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Dec 17, 2009, at 4:06 PM

davidnoe.....you have a memory like an elephant! I believe you scored 100% on all those North Main kids. I remember them all except the Ross kid. He has kinda slipped my mind. Tommy Flowers was a real good buddy...he was our same age...played the piano. Camille was little younger...also went to Vandy. Do you remeber the Pyrdam kids...lived in the old house between the Robinsons and the Parkers? The Brantley girls had a big brother Virgil....The only other kids on our side were Billy, Mary Lee and Bobby Parker (the banker's kids) who lived next door to the Simmons. Across the street were a few kids...Dean O'Donnely...and sometimes Judy and Mike Rice when they visited their grandparents...the Caleb Thompsons.. Across from the Huffmans were the Musgraves and the Guy Hoovers. Those Hoovers owned a cow from whom we got fresh milk daily right from the udder.

In those early years, you were a little stockier than your slim brother. You explained it as "I'm just growing east and west...while he's growing north and south." Just curious if the last 60 years have changed your respective directions of growth? I'm trying to find somebody with a spare tire besides me.

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Thu, Dec 17, 2009, at 5:31 PM

leeiii and davidnoe....yeah, that's OK...I know y'all are Manning fans...but remember he's already shared in a lot of "glory" while a certain other team has wallowed in the depths of despair so long their fans had to wear "Aints" bags over their heads. Come on...have a heart!

You may know that Archie is the BIGGEST Saints fan in the Crescent City. Now if his favorite team comes up against his favorite son down the road, he'll become the media's top interview target. Fun...fun...fun. Maybe he and Eli will just go fishing.

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Thu, Dec 17, 2009, at 5:47 PM

OK, here's some East Lane St. gossip from about ninety years ago. It seems that Prentice Cooper was quite the dashing young man about town, circa 1915-20, and had a sports car. I believe my dad said, a Stutz Bearcat. But David doesn't remember the make of car -- and he remembers essentially everything, so I may be inventing that.

Anyway, although Cooper was well-heeled and considered very "eligible," he was reputed to be the very opposite of a big spender. (Three of my aunts were within five years of his age and lived within two blocks of his home; they were almost certainly the source of this rumor.) His normal budget for a casual date was 25 cents.

So he would pick up one of the local charmers, and offer her a choice between having a soda (a dime apiece, for his and hers), or riding out the best paved road -- I think it was the Unionville Pike, but maybe the one to Murfreesboro -- past the first toll gate. Then he was able to run his car for several miles at a high speed, almost to the second gate, where he had to turn around (or go over budget). Most of the girls chose the turnpike option, because it was exciting. Other local boys could take them for a soda, but not for a spin in a fast car.

-- Posted by razyn on Thu, Dec 17, 2009, at 8:01 PM

steadyeddie, I know where that spare tire is.

-- Posted by leeiii on Thu, Dec 17, 2009, at 8:15 PM

Is any attention being paid to the fact that Shelbyville turns 200 next year? It hadn't crossed my mind, but last night I was looking at the 1969 T-G "sesquicentennial" history book. I was particularly struck by the 1810 deed from Clement Cannon, on p. 7; the descriptions of the 1810 courthouse arrangements (both temporary and longer range) on p. 18; and the discussion of the 1810 Holland House on p. 33. There may be other such references. Anyway, the laying out and settlement of Shelbyville as the county seat preceded its incorporation by nine years.

Depends on what one thinks is worth celebrating, I suppose. From the cultural standpoint, the legislative act of incorporation is virtually meaningless; the settlement itself is what matters. It matters more in Shelbyville than in most other places, since the town plan here is cited in the scholarly literature (especially by cultural geographers) as the earliest known example with the central courthouse square and the grid of primary streets extending from its corners, rather than in various other geometric patterns found in older American (and European) cities. The Shelbyville Plan was widely adopted in parts of the U.S. that were settled later.

-- Posted by razyn on Fri, Dec 18, 2009, at 9:14 AM

razyn, I have not heard any talk about it, so I can not answer your question.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Dec 18, 2009, at 10:35 AM

Steadyeddie, I skinnied out while I was at Vandy and later in the Army, but since have acquired somewhat too many pounds - though not proportionately as many as I carried from ages about 8-18.

Mrs. Musgrave was the grandmother of my cousins Raford and Henry Hulan (and later Angela and Tom), and when they'd visit her we'd usually be invited over as well, since Raford was about a year younger than I and Henry the same younger than Dick and we got along well. I liked it because she had a pair of stone lions in front of her house and I could climb on them and pretend I was Tarzan...

-- Posted by davidnoe on Fri, Dec 18, 2009, at 10:57 AM

davidnoe....I remember those Musgrave lions very well....In fact, I probably sat on them a few times myself. Come to think of it, that would have made a good SAE house with the lions guarding the door. Can't recall if you wore a loin cloth while you were playing Tarzan??

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Fri, Dec 18, 2009, at 11:13 AM

Steadyeddie...No, I didn't wear a loin cloth, since I didn't have one - nor a hunting knife. I craved both, but never acquired them. I did probably just wear a pair of shorts and underpants, though, going shirtless and shoeless if weather permitted...(hey, it was 65 years ago; my memory is good but not infallible).

-- Posted by davidnoe on Sat, Dec 19, 2009, at 4:15 PM

Who owned what business is not an area in which I would anticipate scoring very well if taking a test on the subject. But having said that, I am in agreement with leeiii that the names Enochs and Hardison seem to fit together perfectly in my mind, in fact thinking of either name calls up the other.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Fri, Jul 24, 2009, at 7:22 PM

Advertisement from page 208, 1969 T-G Book:

1939 - 1969

David Enochs and Bill Hardison are proud of the opportunity they have had to serve the people of Shelbyville and Bedford County.

Come out to see the most economical car on the market today.....Drive a Datsun from Dixie Motors.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Jan 3, 2010, at 3:59 PM

ilikeoldsongs, I either did not know or had forgotten that David moved out on Madison with Bill. However, I do seem to remember that they had been in business together down on West Lane just before urban renewal changed the look of all that area. That would have been about the time Studebaker and Packard had merged and was winding down their business in Shelbyville and maybe all over the country.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Jan 3, 2010, at 4:58 PM

ilikeoldsongs, I was just going back and reading the comments in this blog. At one time we were trying to deal with the orange drink dilemma.

On June 22nd you mentioned that the only store you could think of that would fit the bill would be Robert Newell's Market. I got to thinking about that. George and Brooks Tune's Pure Oil Station sat just about the corner of East Franklin and North Main. Just a little bit North of that there was a rather small beer joint, and then Brown's Fruit Stand. I never was in Brown's place but I have an idea that you could get a soft drink in there. I am not sure of the year, maybe mid to late '50s.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Jan 4, 2010, at 5:20 PM

leeiii, I had forgot all about Brown's Market until about a month ago, and have been trying to remember to ask Eugene Brown if the owner was kin to him, but keep forgetting. That could have very well been the source for the orange sodas, as it was there in the proper time frame.

I also wonder,since the poster said the location was in the area of the present O'Reilley's Auto Parts, if maybe Miller's Restaurant could have been the source. It had slipped my mind until the "Back To The Main" segment of these blogs kinda dragged it back between my eyes.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Jan 4, 2010, at 6:07 PM

Where was it, or rather where is it? Miami, of course, and it appears that me and steadyeddie will get a chance to see our favorite teams go head to head in the Super Bowl. May the best team win.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Jan 25, 2010, at 8:02 AM

You're dern tootin'...leeiii. And, of course, this is a warm-up year for the Saints who are really planning for the "big one" in 2013. That will be the first time a team will win the Super Bowl played in its own home city! Open your window...the noise you hear will be coming from Bourbon Street.....Word is that Hurricane Whodat will make landfall in Miami around 5:30 this Sunday. Stay tuned.

-- Posted by steadyeddie on Wed, Feb 3, 2010, at 3:18 PM

Let me throw out a new "where was it?". Where was the first escalator that you can remember, and did any of the stores in Shelbyville have an escalator?

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Feb 21, 2010, at 6:38 AM

Harvey's has it, Harvey's has it

Christmas gifts galore

Oh, what fun it is to shop

At Nashville's largest store

Don't remember an escalator in Shelbyville, but did run up a down escalator near Ft. Dix, along with a couple of fellow idiots, I mean friends.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Feb 21, 2010, at 7:01 AM

I had in my mind that my first was either at Harveys or at Cain Sloan in Nashville. I still can not be sure which.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sun, Feb 21, 2010, at 7:31 AM

Earlier in this blog someone wanted to know the name of the feed mill on Decatur St. Seems like Tom Moore was the owner.He had a huge motor which had a switch to start the mill turning and then when it came up to speed he would turn the switch and the mill would really sing.I remember going there in the late '50's but can't tell you any more than that.

Also I have 2 Pics of Mattie Lou Sagely's toll house in the Bradyville area. My grandfather delivered the mail in that area in the 1920-1930 time period. I don't remember seeing a date on the original pic but I think I can find it.I don't have any Bedford County info. Gentry's Feed & Seed advertized "Baby Chicks" See their add in football game programs from 1959 season. Also in my 1960 'Aquila'. This may have been in an earlier blog but I have read so many this weekend trying to catch up that I don't remember where the question was asked.

-- Posted by Cal t on Sun, Feb 21, 2010, at 6:00 PM

Cal t, It seems to me as if marnold1118 and ilikeoldsongs had expressed an interest in photos of toll gates and toll gate houses. I am also sure that David would be interested.

As for the name Tom Moore, I am having a hard time placing him. Maybe I just did not know that much about the proprietor of the feed mill.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Feb 22, 2010, at 6:08 AM

Cal t and leeiii, a couple of thoughts on the feed mill mentioned above. I agree with leeiii as far as knowing anything about the owner. Beyond knowing the location, and seeing the truck here and there, I don't have a clue about who actually might have owned the business or what he looked like. The name Tom Moore sounds somewhat familiar, but I might be trying to associate that name with Sam Moore, from across town.

It could well be that Mr. Moore purchased the feed mill from Mr. Ferrell, along with the business name, a pretty common practice.

A friend and I were passing by the location of the mill several weeks ago, and I asked him if he remembered the feed mill being there, and he said sure, and do you remember the grocery store that was there at one time? I didn't and I don't remember a grocery store at that location.

Do either of you gentlemen, or anyone else remember that grocery store? I don't doubt it being there since he had an aunt and uncle that lived nearby for several years, and he was in and out of that area frequently. I remember Kate and Buster Parker just down the road, but can't recall this one.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Mon, Feb 22, 2010, at 8:23 AM

In the recesses of my much muddled brain it seems to me that I can remember a grocery store there, but please do not bet the farm on it.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Feb 22, 2010, at 8:50 AM

I don't remember that feed mill being there that long' but right now the only good source of information who verified this is my brother who was at Shelbyville Fire Dept. for years. We also used a Mr. Rodgers ?? mobil mill which I remember more. If anyone wants pics I will be glad to share.

-- Posted by Cal t on Mon, Feb 22, 2010, at 8:54 AM

Cal t, Yes, I would like to have the pictures, and also the toll house pictures. Why don't you send them to David, and he can share them with all of us?

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Feb 22, 2010, at 10:31 AM

OK , I scanned the 2 Toll Gate pics and sent them to David.He can possibly E-mail them to anyone who would like a copy. I'm still looking thru old PICS, so might find something else.

Another question was asked somewhere about a Harry Craddock . There was a Harry that played basketball at Central in 1960 'Aquila' .He was a sophmore then.

-- Posted by Cal t on Mon, Feb 22, 2010, at 10:38 AM

Got the tollgate photos, they'll be in the blog soon. Thanks, Cal t.

-- Posted by David Melson on Mon, Feb 22, 2010, at 12:12 PM

Just stumbled across this blog.Brings back some memories as I was born in Bedford County Hospital. Does anyone remember the parrot in the hospital? How about the real golden eagle mascot we had at the high school caught by coach Martin and the shop class. WE used to roll it out to the field for the games.I think the bldg. next to Browns produce on main st started out in 1940- 41 as the Grill. Anyone rember Earl Locke cafe on main.Was there a kid named Eddie Hoover that lived on Main past Madison.How about a Toppy Harris that rode a whizzer motor bike. Have enjoyed haveing my memorie shaken up by your blogs. Thank you

-- Posted by ifitis on Tue, Mar 2, 2010, at 8:48 PM

ifitis, Welcome to the blog. Yes, I remember a lot of those things that you mentioned, but I am a little foggy about the parrot. I can tell you now that you are really going to enjoy this blog. Be sure to check out all of the Picturing the Past blogs. You will find a lot of good memories there.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Mar 3, 2010, at 6:54 AM

Our late dad, Roy S. Hulan, was born in Shelbyville 100 years ago today. In a fit of nostalgia, I was rereading this blog -- had not seen the recent posts about tollgate photos. If David or Cal T would make them available, one way or another, I'd be interested in seeing them.

-- Posted by razyn on Wed, Mar 10, 2010, at 3:06 PM

razyn, I do not know if you have access to the Sesquicentennial Historical Edition published by the Times-Gazette, October 7, 1969, or not. If you do there is a picture of the toll house and toll gate on the Fayeteville Highway at Rich Valley that was made in 1922. It is on page 260.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Mar 10, 2010, at 3:37 PM

Yep, I have that. Hadn't noticed those, since I recently began to take a more active interest in tollgates. Thanks for the page numbers -- that publication is hard to find something in, twice.

-- Posted by razyn on Wed, Mar 10, 2010, at 4:00 PM

The toll gate pics I have sent to David are from Bradyville area but they show the toll house , the gate and the lady in charge of the gate. I will be happy to share with anyone.David has my e-mail address. Isn't this fun.

-- Posted by Cal t on Wed, Mar 10, 2010, at 6:55 PM

The Bradyville toll gate photos are in the pipeline for next week. Stay tuned.

-- Posted by David Melson on Thu, Mar 11, 2010, at 10:49 AM

razyn, hello from one of your girl cousins who lived across the street from your Huffman grandparents. I enjoyed reading your comments earlier in this blog. I have fond memories of your parents from their days in Murfreesboro. We knew where their basketball seats were and always checked to see if they were in the house!

David, you have permission to give razyn my email address.

-- Posted by dianainnc on Thu, Mar 11, 2010, at 11:27 AM

Hi, Diana. I had your address on my last computer -- but they die off even faster than my relatives, so it's gone away to cyber heaven. (Or possibly the other place.)

-- Posted by razyn on Thu, Mar 11, 2010, at 12:00 PM

I just happened to read this blog for the 1st time up here in Cherry Hill, NJ and it just drives me crazy wanting to comment on most of the questions since I know a majority of the Answers.

Just Let me throw out many one-liners to many of them.

I'm Lytle Hoover born in Shelbyville in 1932.

Main St.

Eddie Hoover lived on N.Main about where you mentioned. It was the Guy Hoover Family, wife Allie Pearl, Eddie & older brother Billy

Guy's parents Oscar Hoover also lived.

At 710 N. Main was my Grandfather's family H.F. Hoover with Wife and daughters Annie Mae, & Merriel, and son Terry(my Father)

Our family lived in the Hoover Funeral Home on Atkinson St (no long a street) I'm sending photos of the houses on that street.

Madison St.

The little grocery store by Hoover St. (By RC Cola Plant) was Hoover's Market (opened 1945 - 1949)

Up at the traffic light was Yancy's Store(who also had Yancy's flowers up the street)

The big market's first name was Shelbyville Super Mkt.(opened in 1946 1st market to be a SUPER Mkt. in town)(Was now Big Red last time I visited Shelbyville.

South Side Square

That was the Rexall Drug Store and that market was A&P (previously Jewel Tea) That shop between it and Nina's Dress Shop was the original Blue Ribbon Bridal Shop.(Had a gray Horse movable statue in Front) Next to Nina's the Hoover's Furniture Store (later McDonald's Furniture and then Knox Pitts.

There was also once a Grocery store on SE (where H.J. Thompson was) at the traffic light which was first a Piggly Wiggly and later Kroger.

-- Posted by OWHO on Tue, Mar 16, 2010, at 1:27 AM

OWHO, welcome to the blog. It is easy to see that you have very much that you can add to what we are trying to do. Please check in on a regular basis and feel free to add your two cents worth.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Mar 16, 2010, at 7:51 AM

Welcome, OWHO. Looking forward to lots of comments from you.

-- Posted by David Melson on Tue, Mar 16, 2010, at 7:32 PM

I have lived here all my life. I grew up in the 70's. I have really enjoyed reading about all the history of our great little town.

Does anyone remember what the gas station was that used to be where the Domino's Pizza is now? I think that it used to be a Kay's Ice Cream Parlor before Domino's. But it seems that it was a gas station first. As a matter of fact, you used to could see where the gas pumps were until they recently repaved the lot. If you look at the current Domino's building, you can visualize where the bay doors were.

I also remember the State Troopers office on Madison. Wasn't it where Shoney's was and the Chinese place is now?

The town has changed so much since I was young. Great memories...thanks to everyone for your stories.

-- Posted by bugforever on Thu, Mar 18, 2010, at 8:47 PM

bugforever, I have been gone from Shelbyville since 1976, but if you will give me directions to Dominos I will scratch my brain and see if I can come up with an answer for you.

I do not remember the State Troopers ever having an office outside of the Court House, but if the Shoney's that you mention was on Madison close to the old Madison Street Elementary School then there once was a quonset hut for the Boy Scouts, and later a building was added on the Madison Street side and it became some kind of Childcare concern.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Mar 19, 2010, at 5:33 AM

bugforever, I looked up the address of Domino's Pizza at 757 Madison Street on Bing Maps. If this is the correct location then I can never remember a service station being there. From the 50s on it was always the Bedford Motor Court.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Mar 19, 2010, at 8:48 AM

leeiii,

Bing maps seems to be having a problem lately, and I think it might be the fault of Lane Kiffin, though I can't say for sure. It acted up on me a couple of days ago, so to check it out I looked up my own house, and sure enough I now live 5 lots West of my former location, in a completely different house. Hope those folks don't mind.

The telephone book lists Domino's Pizza at 757, which I think was either the former location of Dewey Arnold's place, or very close to it.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Fri, Mar 19, 2010, at 9:20 AM

Thanks ilikeoldsongs. That would account for the bay doors, but I do not ever remember seeing gas pumps at that location, and Kay's Ice Cream was after I had left.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Mar 19, 2010, at 9:37 AM

Okay, I have got the Domino's building spotted now. When that building was first built in the late 60s it was the site of one of the first two liquor stores in Shelbyville. I believe that it was run by Jimmy and Fred Richardson. The other liquor store was on North Main in the same block of buildings as Renegar's Drug Store and I believe that it was run by Joe Bowman.

-- Posted by leeiii on Fri, Mar 19, 2010, at 9:54 AM

The Domino's building is the old Dixie Motors building, where they sold Studebakers before moving further out Madison and becoming a Datsun dealer after Studebaker's demise. One of my earliest memories is of Dixie Motors at that location. BTW, the building they moved to was apaprently originally built for a short-lived Rambler dealership, according to a 1965 Times-Gazette ad I saw a while back.

-- Posted by David Melson on Sat, Mar 20, 2010, at 9:34 AM

Thanks David. I am drawing a blank on Dixie Motors being at that location.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sat, Mar 20, 2010, at 1:50 PM

The 1969 book , page 208 ,shows Dixie Motors at 1009 Madison Street and there is a Datsun Sign, but I don't see gas pumps.

-- Posted by Cal t on Sat, Mar 20, 2010, at 10:07 PM

The reason I mentioned the gas pump was that there used to be a long oval shape right in front of the building in the concrete that resembled the shape of a gas pump. So maybe it was not a gas pump but a sign? Not sure. My husband (both of us worked a Domino's) said he always thought that the rack over the 3 part sink in Domino's now was previously a tire rack. So maybe Dixie Motors sold tires and worked on cars...hence the bay doors.

I find all this history so interesting. Thanks again for all your searching to answer my questions.

Anyone else remember the building that I remember going in to take my driver's license test. I thought that was where the State Trooper's office was because I remember seeing the cars parked there in front of the building. It was a different shape from normal buildings. It was rounded kind of a half moon shape and green in color if I remember correctly.

leeiii I think you are correct in that it was closer to the school that I was thinking.

I look forward to reading more from everyone.

-- Posted by bugforever on Sun, Mar 21, 2010, at 9:28 PM

Also, does anyone have an pictures of the old drive-in theatre? I loved that place! I need to find out where everyone finds their pictures. Thanks!

-- Posted by bugforever on Sun, Mar 21, 2010, at 9:34 PM

My drivers test was from the Court House basement, but I remember a Green round building being on the far side of the Madison Street School playground on the side away from Madison Street. Was that Sandusky Street? Seems like this was a Boy Scout building or something like that also.

-- Posted by Cal t on Sun, Mar 21, 2010, at 10:31 PM

bugforever, the quonset building mentioned by leeiii was where drivers tests were given for a while, hate to admit it, but I forgot to renew mine once, and took the test there to get a new one. I think they moved to the old Bedford County Training School for a while after that, but don't bet the farm on it.

-- Posted by ilikeoldsongs on Sun, Mar 21, 2010, at 11:10 PM

I thought that was where I took my test to get my license. It was a cool looking building. Maybe the boy scouts met there at one time.

-- Posted by bugforever on Tue, Mar 23, 2010, at 10:12 PM

Yes, I was in the Boy Scouts in the early 50s and we met in that building. Dr. Sam Pierce and Gene Seagraves were the leaders of our troop, Troop 118.

-- Posted by leeiii on Wed, Mar 24, 2010, at 6:43 AM

Boy, is my face ever red with shame. Back in March of this year on this blog bugforever had asked if anyone could remember what was in the building where Dominos Pizza now resides before them. I stated that the building was built in the early 60s for Fred and Jimmy Richardson's liquor store.

Well to make a long story somewhat shorter, I was in Shelbyville this past week-end and I stopped by to visit with Frankie Nichols for just a few minutes. I asked him about the history of that building. He told me that Roy Stallings first had a service station at that location, and later Dixie Motors was there. All of that was before Fred and Jimmy had the liquor store there. Later the liquor store moved into what is now Handy Dandy.

I still have a blank spot in my memory concerning both the service station and Dixie Motors. I am sorry about the misinformation.

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, May 10, 2010, at 8:11 AM

Looking back at one of the old comments about a photo near the Fire Station. The letters HOO that were visible was Hoover's Furniture Store, but not the same Hoover. My Grandfather's store on southside square was H.F. Hoover, but that was Guy Hoover's Furniture Store. He was my Grandfather's nephew, son of Oscar Hoover,

As mentioned before Guy Hoover was Father to Eddie & Billy. He also at one time was Fire Chief who shows up in the bi-centennial photos.

(a sidebar comment - My grandfather was one of 11 children of James Hoover's second wife. His father also had 9 children by his first wife who had died. So with 2 generations of 20 male and female Hoovers with large families, when I grew up in the 1930-40s it seemed that half of the names in Bedford County were my relatives - Lambs, Thompsons, Reeds, Taylors, Smiths, etc. - HA!)

Regarding another blog item: I saw that car that hit Gant's Cleaners. It had missed the curve, went airborne and went halfway through the 8-10ft stone basement wall. It was still stuck in the middle of the wall suspended slightly above ground. I remember it was metallic medium green. The next day there was just a giant hole. Some of us were able to walk up to Gant's front door. Looking at the large concrete pavement entrance you could see the building's wall was offset 12-20 inches from the concrete pad. This was sometime between 1945-49. I believe Gants Cleaners had several crash incidents. We heard the rumor that this one happened in a state police car chase and the car was a bootlegger's.

-- Posted by OWHO on Sat, Jun 12, 2010, at 1:55 PM

OWHO, Thanks for the comments. That information really adds to this blog, both about your family and about Gant's cleaners. Please come back often with more good information.

-- Posted by leeiii on Sat, Jun 12, 2010, at 2:17 PM

Reminds me of a story:

Back in '49, while attending George Peabody College for Teachers (Nashville, TN)....

The major retail outlet in Nashville was a general merchandise purveyor named "Harvey's", whose

omnipresent radio jingle concluded with the rousing, "Harvey's has it, Harvey's has it, Harvey's has it!"

"Bertha", the general caretaker/cook/bottle washer in college housing inhabited by several local scholars,went to town one day to do some shopping and came back looking very disappointed.

When asked why, she said she'd gone to Harvey's to purchase a chamber pot, and was told they

didn't keep that item in stock, and added somewhat sarcastically: "They keep sayin' 'Harvey's has it,Harvey's has it', but I just found out that Harvey's ain't got a pot to p... in!"

If anyone can link to a rendition of that famous jingle, s/he will earn the gratitude of any who were around to hear it and are still around.

-- Posted by SpecialKinNJ on Mon, Nov 15, 2010, at 11:06 AM

SpecialKinNJ, that is a good story. By the way, did that same George Peabody College for Teachers later become part of Vanderbilt University?

-- Posted by leeiii on Mon, Nov 15, 2010, at 1:55 PM

I remember "Harvey's has it " and went to Google and "Harvey's has it Nashville" . Lots of do you remember things on this site, but I can't remember all the song.

-- Posted by Cal t on Tue, Nov 16, 2010, at 9:47 AM

I could be wrong but it seems to me as if at least part of the jingle went "Harveys has it, Harveys has it, Christmas gifts galore, something something something, at Nashville's (biggest or newest) store". About that same time there was a James Stewart movie by the name of "Harvey". Harvey was a big old rabbit that may have been a figment of James Stewart's imagination.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Nov 16, 2010, at 1:04 PM

Cal t after I read your latest post I too decided to Google Harveys has it in Nashville. I found a most interesting link at www.nashlinks/remember that was remembering Nashville from the 50s, 60s, and 70s. It is well worth taking the time to check out. That guy has done a lot of the same thing for Nashville that David Melson has done for us about Shelbyville.

-- Posted by leeiii on Tue, Nov 16, 2010, at 2:51 PM


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David Melson is a copy editor and staff writer for the Times-Gazette.