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Saturday, July 26, 2014

Black Friday

Posted Friday, November 9, 2012, at 9:20 PM

It's that time of year again, Black Friday,the day that retailers have great deals on everything you think you need. Many people rush out to spend their money to get everything they want. People get up in the middle of the night, leaving their families behind during Thanksgiving, they stand in lines for hours, regardless of the weather, sometimes becoming violent just to save a few dollars.

How many of you participate in Black Friday sales? Out of those that do participate, how many support Obama and his plan to tax the rich more? Because if you do, I would like to hear your explanation of how you are against the rich and think they should pay more taxes but yet you become their puppets and run to their sales giving them your hard earned money, for things you think you need, only to make them richer!


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jstus,

You would be interested to know that those Walmart employees NOT making a living wage do so by their own making.

First, let me say that cashier/floor positions are NOT meant to be family supporting positions. They are meant for students, those wanting a secondary income,or for retired individuals. The skill level is such that those vying for those positions area dime a dozen.

Further, Walmart does have decent paying positions and they are not that hard to land with a good work record, positive evaluations, and a WILLINGNESS to work and take whatever hours are offered. CSM's, department mangers, and zone mangers are postions that pay decently only require a little experience and common sense.Also, in many areas a degree is not, at this point anyway, required to enter salaried manger positions. Many store managers started out as hourly, and some earn salaries of near or over $200k with bonuses.

No, Walmart is not a terrible comapny to work for. That is, if you are a decent employee.

Also, it behooves ALL employees to keep payroll low. Bigger bonuses - yes, hourlys can get bonuses - and better stock prices enefit everyone.

-- Posted by malamutemom on Tue, Nov 20, 2012, at 12:39 PM

I will be backing the Wal-Mart strike by NOT shopping Wal-Mart until they stop passing their employees wages on to us by way of paying them so little they are still able to qualify for federal assistance. WHile there are businesses that do not have enough profit to pay livable wages Wal-Mart and their profit margin most defiantly can. If I want to pay their employees I will do so directly since that is the only way it will get to them.

Shop local, buy American where possible, this years lets make that our gift to AMERICA .

-- Posted by jstus on Fri, Nov 16, 2012, at 10:16 PM

"You can't tax the rich. You only increase their overhead which they pass along as the cost of doing business."

It would seem that there is some mixing of "the rich" and "big business" in that statement. But addressing your statement as if the two were the same thing; That would only be true if the myth that prices are determined by cost was true. It is not. Prices are set to provide the maximum revenue the market will produce. An example that should be easy to understand is the price of Yankees tickets. Tickets cost up to as much as $2500 each. The ticket prices are so high that the stadium never sells out. But a sold out stadium would be counted as a failure by Yankees management. At the prices they charge, their total revenue is more than it would be if they set the prices at a level where the stadium would sell out. If they charged any more, ticket sales would fall off to the point that they had less revenue. The cost of providing those seats is not a factor at all. The stadium was built with public money and the team receives generous public subsidies in addition to tv revenue and license agreements. They could give away tickets and still be profitable. They set the prices to maximize their revenue, because that is what capitalism is all about. If the Yankees paid more in taxes, they would not be able to raise the prices on anything without losing revenue. And before you lie awake at night worrying about the poor Yankees, have no fear. They will not shut down the team and stop making money just because they might not make as much.

If "the rich" are taxed more, they will have to pay it. Looking at it logically; if the cost was simply going to be passed on, why would they spend billions of dollars buying elected officials?

-- Posted by lazarus on Sun, Nov 11, 2012, at 11:43 PM

I do not participate in the Black Friday madness. No amount of savings is worth the chaos and I try to not leave the house. If there is something I need that can't wait until Monday, I will wait until about 8pm to venture to the store.

I am opposed to the taxing of the rich, because the definition of 'rich' CAN change as time progresses. Today, we tax those making over $250k, tomorrow we extend those levies to those making $200k, etc. However, our economy IS a consumer based one, and our shopping supports more than just the major shareholders of a corporation. It supports store employees, supplier employees, transportation employees, etc.

-- Posted by malamutemom on Sun, Nov 11, 2012, at 2:15 PM

We have taken advantage of the sales if there was an item we wanted marked down for our children. Now it's online only basically and we do it when we want. It's like tax free day, people go crazy for a 10% day when normally they wouldn't bat an eye at it. It's all about marketing and building a selling frenzy. Kinda like politics, stand on the platform that I will tax the rich because "we" like to hear that as a whole.

-- Posted by eglnation on Sun, Nov 11, 2012, at 1:43 PM

I usually take advantage of online BF sales if any at all. I rarely go to any stores on BF. Beyond my children's Christmas goodies, there will be little gift giving this year and it will all be paid for in cash.

You can't tax the rich. You only increase their overhead which they pass along as the cost of doing business. It's ALWAYS the middle class that gets squeezed. Look at all of the medical device manufacturers getting ready to lay off employees as the Obamascare taxes on medical devices kick in. You can't tax a corporation any more than you can tax a floor, a tire or a medical device. Only people can pay taxes. Between the employees, the consumers and the shareholders, who do you think will pay and what income class is that person in? Obama is a lawyer and not a business man. His income tax desires have more to do with his sense of fairness and social justice than with increasing revenue or stimulating the economy. He had plenty of opportunity to raise taxes during the first two years of his first term when he had a super majority. If taxing the rich was so instrumental in salvaging the economy, why did he not do it then? Instead, he wasted billions on buying the UAW's support and investing in green energy failures. It wouldn't surprise me if he won a Nobel prize for economics though. Wall Street did OK in the Obama recovery while the middle class not so much.

-- Posted by cortnerkin on Sat, Nov 10, 2012, at 4:05 AM


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Rodney Simmons is a life long resident of Bedford County. He grew up in the Halls Mill area and graduated from Community High School. Rodney's career has primarily been in the construction industry and he holds a degree in Construction Management. Some of his hobbies include fishing, reading and writing. He presently lives in Shelbyville with his wife and two teenage children.
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