[Masthead] Partly Cloudy ~ 59°F  
High: 75°F ~ Low: 51°F
Saturday, Oct. 25, 2014

Whew! I get to start another week. I'm ready! Plus, a cat update!

Posted Monday, June 21, 2010, at 7:56 AM

(Photo)
Sally, expectant mommy.
When I was younger I remember playing so hard on the weekends that it was a relief to come back to work. I know that sounds contrary to most, but there are a few weekends each year that are so packed with things to do that returning to a normal workday is relaxing. Hope I say that tonight!

We had to do an intervention this morning and I think it is working out well already. Sally is our last of the "dumped" cat family remaining down the road. All have moved on and we thought that Sally had too but after a few days she was back to the feeding dishes. Big Boy will probably always drift in and out until his destiny arrives but Sally was pregnant again and we felt it was time to bring her up.

She was highly P.O.'d when we put her in the carrier but after about 20 minutes in her new 1500 squ. foot digs, she seems to be accepting it quite well. She has an indoor plumbing, a full bowl of water and food and protection from all the 'baddies' outside. She was back to purring, rubbing and all around contentment, so I think things went well.

Holly vacated the palace two weeks ago when her inner urgings (being in heat) urged her over the top of the eaves and out into the woods. She comes to eat in a shed and before her next heat episode we plan to make a visit to the vet. Same for Sally as soon as she weans her kittens.


Comments
Showing comments in chronological order
[Show most recent comments first]

awwwwww pretty cat.. hope she is able to stay safe.. My father in law has something in Monteagle getting his cats and his elderly dog. He thinks it is either coyotes or a bob cat.

-- Posted by 4fabfelines on Mon, Jun 21, 2010, at 9:00 AM

My bet is on the bobcat, unless his cats go into open fields a lot. My reasoning is that a cat can take flight quickly in trees, while a bobcat can them follow up the tree. Of course, if they don't jump up the tree, coyotes are fast.

Generally our dogs keep the bobcats at bay here while they play with coyotes, but watch out for bobcat disease transmitted by dog ticks. I know, it sounds complicated but there are several types of ticks and for your cats' sake I would consider them all dangerous.

Our dogs are the ones who roam the most and have more chances of picking up ticks that were on bobcats. While I try to use diatomaceous earth to control fleas, we treat all the dogs with a monthly treatment from the vet. This way IF they get a tick in the woods, it will more than likely feed on the dog and then DIE before they get on the cats.

If your male cats are not fixed, they will roam quite a bit. I am not sure how well the vet treatment works for stopping the disease from infecting them. It will kill the tick but the damage may already be done. If a domestic cats gets the disease it is very likely they will die from it and often within a few days.

Some cats do not react well to the monthly treatment. If they are lethargic for a day or two after the application, I would suggest letting your vet know and possibly trying another type of treatment. If they continue to react that way, I would suggest making that cat an inside cat. This is from our experiences, not any medical findings so please don't take it as a professional opinion.

-- Posted by stevemills on Mon, Jun 21, 2010, at 11:32 AM

We have an orphan kitten, he was abandoned when he was 7-days old. He is now four weeks old and fleas have been one of our major battles with him. They can leech the life out of a kitten in days. We have had limited success by bathing him. A website I found about caring for "orphan" kittens recommended 'Lemon Joy' (not the one called ULTRA, as it contains bleach.) He gets a bath every other day and it keeps the fleas to a minimum.

Our senior cats (ages 14 - 18 years) get monthly baths in blue 'Dawn' and sprayed lightly with Adam's. It doesn't kill all the fleas, but it also doesn't risk their health either. Our dogs get weekly baths and spot sprayed where the fleas seem to collect.

The house (our cats are indoor and the dogs indoor/outdoor) gets vacuumed and spayed (Adam's for upholstery and carpet) and swept daily. There is a product for the yard, but with several fenced in acres to run in, I can't afford it to try it. We don't seem to be having trouble with ticks (knock on wood) this year.

Steve, does the DE work in the yard?

-- Posted by amalphia on Tue, Jun 22, 2010, at 12:22 PM

DE will work in the yard but when it rains it is part of the soil. If you spread it like lime it would probably kill mosy fleas and eggs but even though it is relaively inexpensive, that application could use a 50 pound bag quickly.

I have heard it used on carpet and we have used it around the baseboards to kill other types of insects. When vacuumed it goes in the bag and kills fleas or insect you might have captures.

It is not instantaneous. It works by penetrating the joints of the insects and dehydrating them. It can be mixed in water and sprayed or just dusted. ONe of the things we like about it is that it is safe for pets and humans.

It is not discriminating so don't spray it around flowers where honey bees might get it on them. As soon as my plants started flowering, I was more selective in my placement of it. You also don't want to get it in your pets eyes.

Ask our dog Pita about that. She would not stay still and looked like she had been in a boxing match for about 24 hours. Puffy, red eyes.

Citrus is a good repellent and insecticide. I would think you could squeeze a lemon in with Ivory liquid or a non-tearing baby shampoo. The soap and lemon should do a nice job.

Thanks for bringing that up amalphia.

-- Posted by stevemills on Tue, Jun 22, 2010, at 1:36 PM


Respond to this blog

Posting a comment requires free registration. If you already have an account, enter your username and password below. Otherwise, click here to register.

Username:

Password:  (Forgot your password?)

Your comments:
Please be respectful of others and try to stay on topic.


Steve Mills and his wife have one daughter and live on a farm outside of Bell Buckle. They previously owned two coffee/ice cream shops, currently operate an internet sales company and teach classes, but his primary job involves the paper industry worldwide. Hobbies and interests lie in gardening, photography, recorded music and of course, their pets.