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Snake Palm sent by fellow T-G blog as well as Weed'em & Reap member

Posted Friday, April 29, 2011, at 11:55 AM

(Photo)
Snake Palm Voodoo lily, Devils tongue, Corpse flower, Amorphophallus
Here is an interesting plant.

Steve,

I just wanted to share a couple of pics of Snake Palm.

I've had these since 2004 or 2005. Usually around the end of May the Snake Palm starts to pop up-they are kind of like a bulb-and get larger during the year.

A few years back, a couple came up early, and to my surprise, were like a pitcher plant, bad smell and all.

Well, a guess this just happens every few years, and this year, they are 'blooming' again. And the smell...kind of like rotting flesh!

It smells like something died!

It's similar to a 'carrion' plant....

More info and pictures http://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/amor...


Comments
Showing comments in chronological order
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A question or two: How long does it have the wonderful smell?

Are you overwintering this inside or is it staying outside?

-- Posted by stevemills on Fri, Apr 29, 2011, at 5:33 PM

Outside, and I don't remember how long it stays like this-the smell. I'll have to pay more attention to it this time...

interesting thing about the tubers...they are used for a long of things in Asia and Japan, including to lose weight and to control high cholesterol-go figure.

-- Posted by espoontoon on Fri, Apr 29, 2011, at 9:10 PM

Over the years, has it produced viable seeds or suckers? After 6-7 years how big has the bulb grown?

I could see smell causing people to lose their hunger but that is curious about how it is being used. Seems like more research is in my future.

-- Posted by stevemills on Sat, Apr 30, 2011, at 7:47 AM

Well, these blooms don't always happen. It usually just grows up with the palms, about 4 foot in height.

I think it has produced more tubers over the years. I've thought about digging some up and relocating them, or even some propagation, but I don't want to mess up a good thing either!

-- Posted by espoontoon on Sat, Apr 30, 2011, at 7:53 AM

The good thing espoontoon is referring to is that these are sub tropical and even tropical plants. Getting these to grow in our climate has been a successful experiment and changing anything could result in a total loss, so I understand the feelings.

The nursery that sold the original bulb even wanted to know how they were doing, so if you are thinking about trying one, know that we are in a fringe area. Yours might not survive.

-- Posted by stevemills on Sun, May 1, 2011, at 7:29 AM

Steve, are our gardens in danger from Cicada's this year?

-- Posted by cherokee2 on Sat, May 7, 2011, at 3:37 PM

We need to plant some around city hall the police station we got a lot of bad smell there and they need more.

-- Posted by airforce one on Sun, May 8, 2011, at 3:14 AM

Cherokee, I have not heard of an cicada invasion, but will check. Even when they are out, I have never had a big issue with them but there is always a first.

Have your heard some hints of a big emergence?

-- Posted by stevemills on Sun, May 8, 2011, at 9:42 AM

In fact there is some talk about the 13 year cicada. "Come May of this year, most of Middle Tennessee will again see the cicadas, according to Dr. Frank Hale, entomologist at the University of Tennessee Extension."

I don't think they will be more than annoying with the exception of small trees ans shrubs. The female lays its' eggs under the limbs of small "pencil size" limbs, so you might want to cover fruit trees and other small trees you want to protect with netting.

I was on the the look out for small netting this spring and could not find much so maybe you should buy it now. Return it if you do not have to open it but otherwise it will probably disappear off the shelves quickly once the cicadas arrive.

Again, they should not be a problem for our gardens like a swarm of locus or grasshoppers, just annoying on windshields, outdoor events and enjoying peace & quiet.

-- Posted by stevemills on Sun, May 8, 2011, at 9:51 AM

I left the 't' off locust. Sorry.

-- Posted by stevemills on Sun, May 8, 2011, at 9:58 AM

I have a hackberry tree that is COVERED with the cicadas!

My dogs think they are a tasty treat-go figure...

-- Posted by espoontoon on Mon, May 9, 2011, at 9:51 AM

I am hoping PITA will have found her calling. We don't have any yet, but I'll prime her with night beetles.

I have heard that other societies eat these as treats. I guess that is a way of finding a "silver lining".

-- Posted by stevemills on Tue, May 10, 2011, at 7:14 AM


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Steve Mills and his wife have one daughter and live on a farm outside of Bell Buckle. They previously owned two coffee/ice cream shops, currently operate an internet sales company and teach classes, but his primary job involves the paper industry worldwide. Hobbies and interests lie in gardening, photography, recorded music and of course, their pets.