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How do you say no to a pet that depends on you?

Posted Thursday, September 1, 2011, at 8:33 PM

Kit Kat has been with us over ten years now and if he had his choice, he would sleep on my left arm every night. If I am watching TV, he will be there to get and give some loving.

Last week I noticed him really slowing down and he started wanting to stay outside. We humored him at first, but when we brought him in and found that he was not eating, and drinking very little, we surmised something was up.

Took him into the vet and sure enough he had some type of major infection, but we could not identify where it came from. They gave him a cocktail of antibiotic shots for three days in a row.

We did not ask how much at the time but wow, it must have been super stuff. Over $100! If we had asked, would we have been able to say no? Probably not, but...wow!

It seems to have worked. He is sleeping with me again and seems to be his old self, but what if it comes back? Is there a limit?


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Some buisinesses try to get you for every penny that can possibly dig out of you. I NEVER buy anything at the store or do any kind of buisiness without asking how much? I went to the dentist this past Tuesday thinking I probably needed a tooth pulled. The detist gave me 2 shots, took an x-ray and then tells me he can find nothing wrong with the tooth except that it is a little loose. He did another x-ray on a different tooth at my request after I asked him how much it would cost and he says... "no charge". He explained that he was there to save teeth if possible and that if I wanted him to clean it and give me antobiotics we could see if my pain would go away before we decide to pull it. So that is what I chose to do. He spent 1 hour with me, took 2 x-rays, gave me 2 shots to prepare me for pulling the tooth and guess what he charged me. NOTHING, not one penny. And if the tooth needs pulling in the future he will be the one to do it.

When it comes to your vet or anything else. Make a few phone calls, doesnt cost anything to price check office visits etc. I have heard that there are vets that might be out of town but the price is a lot cheaper for the same services and treatments. My husband and I have found that is a good idea to price check when you go to the buisinesses in town that sell replacement car parts etc...there can be a huge difference in the price at one compared to the other for the exact same item. All it takes is a phone call.

-- Posted by AmericanWoman on Thu, Sep 1, 2011, at 9:42 PM

Pet insurance can be a good idea. It's one more area where a little investigation can help get the best value for the price and services offered.

There are a lot of healers that put patient welfare over the almighty dollar.

They prefer to prevent ailments over curing them and offer the simplest,most cost effective remedies when they can do so without compromising on quality of care.

These better health care providers will work out a way for folks to afford the care they require.

Often,we have no need for extreme or expensive care for ourselves or our pets.

We may be tempted toward the false economy of neglecting wellness care or treatment when an injury or illness does come along.

But there are few better uses for our funds than increasing the duration and the quality of our lives.

If we can obtain decent care at a fair price,we're making a good investment.

If neither good care or reasonable cost is readily available to people of every economic level,then,perhaps,we need health reform for all species.

There are times when it is the kindest,most sensible thing to make a patient comfortable and let them go-without using heroic measures that prolong death rather than life.

But,when there are ways of relieving suffering,restoring health and preventing damage,then we shouldn't be denied those helps because of money or a perception that some lives aren't worth the trouble.

The cost of maintaining health for anyone can be terribly high.

But,how high a price will we be paying when we can no longer have adequate health care for ourselves,our pets,our elders,our disabled and disadvantaged?

-- Posted by quantumcat on Thu, Sep 1, 2011, at 11:59 PM

We have had a lot of expense with our dachshound. First having her fixed, then surgery to remove a squeaker out of one of her toys, then a intestinal infection, and the usual necessary shots. I wish that we had invested in pet insurance, and we still might in the future. We never tried to see if another vet might have been cheaper and there probably was cheaper out there, but quality of care was number one. We have used our vet for over 30 years, and I know that he puts his heart and soul into the care of his patients. I believe when you bring a pet into your home it becomes one of your family and the price of their health is just part of it.

-- Posted by cookie on Fri, Sep 2, 2011, at 8:32 AM

AmericanWoman, please give us the name of your dentist. I am in the market for an honest Dentist, my former dental practitioner (not from this area) was attempting to get an early retirement on my teeth alone.

-- Posted by Bronk on Sat, Sep 3, 2011, at 12:23 AM

"There are times when it is the kindest,most sensible thing to make a patient comfortable and let them go-without using heroic measures that prolong death rather than life."

I agree. I've also faced times when I let a pet go, not because the vet was charging too much, but simply because I couldn't afford it. Looking back, I wish I had tried for a payment plan and I believe my vet would have worked with me.

-- Posted by jbillswms on Sat, Sep 3, 2011, at 1:09 PM

I have about a 200.00 limit. Of course, that depends on the pet a little too. SO it's flexable...

-- Posted by espoontoon on Sun, Sep 4, 2011, at 8:32 AM

When our kids were younger we had a dog who decided to chase the wrong car, except for a broken leg he was fine, the break was bad though and the vet sold us on sending it to a learning college to have a plate put in it to ensure it would heal correctly (preventing a limp or possible amputation if it healed incorrectly) Almost 800.00 later our pup came home, cast and all. They let us do this on a payment plan, well not long after the cast came off that lil stinker decided to once again go chase a car, well the car caught him, :( We strongly believe in watching and protecting our dogs, they were not and are not allowed to run, he was a very determined pup. We ended up making payments on his broken leg for a very long time after he was gone....We should have let them amputate the leg if needed or risk a limp, it might have saved his car chasing life..... Would we do it again? Not the fancy surgery, just the life saving basics. The same vet tries to get us to send another dog to a doggy dentist for his over bite.... NO we did not !!! We fed him soft food instead.

-- Posted by wonderwhy on Tue, Sep 6, 2011, at 9:41 PM


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Steve Mills and his wife have one daughter and live on a farm outside of Bell Buckle. They previously owned two coffee/ice cream shops, currently operate an internet sales company and teach classes, but his primary job involves the paper industry worldwide. Hobbies and interests lie in gardening, photography, recorded music and of course, their pets.