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Weed'em & Reap Snake plant Sansevieria free

Posted Friday, January 27, 2012, at 8:19 AM

(Photo)
Sansevieria trifasciata in flower (from Wikipedia)
We meet at 7:00 pm but don't be concerned with time. Come early or late, we will welcome you just the same.

I have about 10+ Sansevieria plants to give away. They are in one pot which I want to keep, but we can separate them depending on how many would like them. If there is only one who wants them, they can have them all. I don't want to come home with them.

Extremely easy to take care of, an indoor plant and they grow well in low light. They apparently came from Africa originally and in doing a quick check for the official name I came across this on Wikipedia "It is commonly called the snake plant .. because of the shape of its leaves, or mother-in-law's tongue because of their sharpness. In China, it is known as hǔwěilŠn (虎尾兰, Tiger's Tail Orchid). In Japan, it is called 'Tiger's Tail,(とらのお)'. In Brazil, it is commonly known as espada-de-s„o-jorge (sword-of-saint-george).

It can flower as seen in the photo, but don't hold your breath for them. In the 35 years+- that I have had them, I may have seen them flower once and it was not profusely. There may be ways to maximize their environment to encourage flowering, but I am not an expert.

There was no need to be an expert, since they grow quite well with neglect. A perfect indoor plant. :-)


Comments
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You gave me one last year, and all I can say is at least it's still alive. It hasn't done much more than that. I wish I could get houseplants to thrive. I can keep them alive for the most part, but they just don't keep growing.

-- Posted by craftin_mom on Fri, Jan 27, 2012, at 11:26 AM

Barbara brought seeds to share, straight from unopened packs. She found a good clearance sale so now many of us will be trying cukes,and tomatoes we would might never gotten around to trying.

I got Cherokee, Charley Chaplin?, Hill Billy (for Kay);-)tomatoes and an Armenian cucumber (cream color). I believe it resembled another one that was white, but I forgot the name.

Two of us shared the Sansevieria mentioned above and it seems just in time to share with others, so my mother will be happy. I got those from her many years ago.

Some interesting and exciting ideas were discussed for the area being developed up on the square. The toughest part might be trying to determine which to do first or can we try two at one time?

We are thinking themed gardens, with exhibition/demonstration plants that mirror the theme, then sensory gardens, butterfly, enabling, espalier, and on and on. Almost too much to get our head around which is why it is going to be tough to choose one.

Maybe if someone who feels strongly for one type, they will spearhead that one and all of us (plus any one who wants to jump in)will assist in the physical construction? Just a thought?

-- Posted by stevemills on Sat, Jan 28, 2012, at 9:34 AM

Steve,

Sansevieria love being outdoors in the warm months. They like early morning sun, shade the rest of the day. Being ouside all summer usually will help induce flowering.

Our rule: outside, water daily inside, water seldom if ever.

-- Posted by dmcg on Sat, Jan 28, 2012, at 6:53 PM

I could see how a decent shot of morning sun would help them. I have so many that some have to survive in light deprived areas but the stronger ones have strong, indirect light.

How warm does it need to be before someone moves them out?

-- Posted by stevemills on Sun, Jan 29, 2012, at 10:30 AM

No frost, it will melt them. We take ours out whenever it is getting warm in the spring. If a cold snap comes, we bring them in for the night. Same in the fall.

-- Posted by dmcg on Mon, Jan 30, 2012, at 2:28 PM


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Steve Mills and his wife have one daughter and live on a farm outside of Bell Buckle. They previously owned two coffee/ice cream shops, currently operate an internet sales company and teach classes, but his primary job involves the paper industry worldwide. Hobbies and interests lie in gardening, photography, recorded music and of course, their pets.