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Friday, Mar. 6, 2015

Commission write-ins ask to be counted

Sunday, June 20, 2010

Three women have asked that write-in votes for them be counted in county commission races in the Aug. 5 general election.

Although Tennessee gives voters the opportunity to cast write-in votes, those votes are not counted unless the recipient asks ahead of time for them to be counted. The deadline for potential write-in candidates to fill out that form at the county election office was Wednesday.

There are nine county commission districts, with two seats in each district. Each district has a single election, with the candidates who receive the top two vote totals winning the seats.

* Georgina Vaughn-Lanier has asked for her votes to be counted in the Third District race. The ballot candidates for that race are incumbents Janice Brothers and Jimmy Patterson. The Third District is in the northwestern portion of the county.

* Anita Epperson has asked for her votes to be counted in the Fourth District race. The ballot candidates for that race are incumbents Billy King and Jimmy Woodson and Republican nominee Rodney Guinn. Guinn was unopposed in the Republican primary for the seat in May, the only party primary race for any of the nine districts. All other ballot candidates for county commission are running as independents. The Fourth District is in the southwestern portion of the county.

* Lizzie Peoples has asked for her votes to be counted in the Seventh District race. The ballot candidates for that race are incumbent Tony Barrett and challenger Denise Graham. Joyce Tune, the other incumbent for that race, had filed qualifying papers to seek re-election but died May 31 and her name has been removed from the ballot. The Seventh District is located within Shelbyville.

Local election administrator Summer Leverette said she is not able to give out the names of the potential write-in recipients over the phone, because of a strict state rule which might interpret that as campaigning. However, the forms -- which were viewed Friday by the Times-Gazette -- are considered public record and can be viewed at the election office.


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