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Wednesday, May 4, 2016

'Jail' for good

Thursday, November 3, 2011

(Photo)
Of course the lock-up was all in fun, and for a good cause, as made evident by these three ladies on the phone raising bail money: Sherry Ammons, Linda Harrison, and Tammy Brady, from Three Rivers Xpress.
(T-G Photo by Colleen Embry) [Order this photo]
Nearly 200 local leaders ended up in jail Wednesday.

But it was all for a good cause.

"The police never came and got me, so I had to turn myself in," said Colleen Embry, one of the jailbirds charged with being a caring, good-natured and influential person.

(Photo)
Tim Lokey pleads with officers to let him out on bail Wednesday. He was one of an estimated 200 local leaders locked up for Wednesday's MDA benefit.
(T-G Photo by Colleen Embry)
$2,000 bail

The Muscular Dystrophy Association's Lock-up Luncheon took place Wednesday at Calsonic Arena. Once jailbirds arrived on site, they had their mug shots taken, sampled jailhouse grub provided by the Barefoot Bay Cafe and then got busy dialing numbers stored away in their cell phones in attempt to make bail.

The MDA set a goal for each person to collect $2,000 before he or she could be freed to return to work. Many planned in advance and didn't have to call for bail money. Instead, they turned in their cash, checks or online donation forms and returned to work with a clean record in no time.

Childhood forms

MD is a group of more than 30 genetic diseases characterized by progressive weakness and degeneration of the skeletal muscles that control movement. Some forms are seen in infancy or childhood, while others may not appear until middle age or later. The disorders differ in terms of the distribution and extent of muscle weakness (some forms of MD also affect cardiac muscle), age of onset, rate of progression, and pattern of inheritance.

Duchenne MD is the most common form of MD and primarily affects boys. It is caused by the absence of dystrophin, a protein involved in maintaining the integrity of muscle. Onset is between 3 and 5 years and the disorder progresses rapidly. Most boys are unable to walk by age 12, and later need a respirator to breathe.

Girls in these families have a 50 percent chance of inheriting and passing the defective gene to their children.

Boys with Becker MD (very similar to but less severe than Duchenne MD) have faulty or not enough dystrophin.

Later years

(Photo)
Dr. Barbara Kaczmarska, a local pediatrician, was also locked up, along with Kevin Tennant of Riverside Medical, Inc.
(T-G Photo by Colleen Embry)
Facioscapulohumeral MD usually begins in the teenage years. It causes progressive weakness in muscles of the face, arms, legs, and around the shoulders and chest. It progresses slowly and can vary in symptoms from mild to disabling.

Myotonic MD is the disorder's most common adult form and is typified by prolonged muscle spasms, cataracts, cardiac abnormalities, and endocrine disturbances. Individuals with myotonic MD have long, thin faces, drooping eyelids, and a swan-like neck.

There is no specific treatment to stop or reverse any form of MD. Treatment may include physical therapy, respiratory therapy, speech therapy, orthopedic appliances used for support, and corrective orthopedic surgery.

For more information about the lock-up or the MDA visit www.mda.org.

(Information provided by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.)

Of course the lock-up was all in fun, and for a good cause, as made evident by these three ladies on the phone raising bail money: Sherry Ammons, Linda Harrison, and Tammy Brady, from Three Rivers Xpress.


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