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Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014

A wonderful life: Family, holiday fun

Sunday, January 8, 2012

My family and I had a wonderful holiday season.

My oldest son, Gabe, came home from California in time for Thanksgiving, and has been with us through the New Year. I have really enjoyed having the whole family together.

During the holidays, we have certainly enjoyed some good entertainment.

Lynn and I watched two delightful DVDs, "Midnight in Paris" and "Water for Elephants."

We took the boys out to see two action packed thrillers, "Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows," and "Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol."

I had the privilege of watching the children's Christmas program at Mt. Lebanon United Methodist on two occasions. It was marvelous! The children, under the leadership of Melissa Neeley and her assistants, did a wonderful job of presenting the Christmas story in a fun fashion.

One night, Gabe and I went to see the South of Broadway Players Dinner Theater at Barefoot Bay Cafe. Their production of "WSOB Radio Presents: It's a Wonderful Life" was wonderful.

The cast of players, six very talented actors, a great musical quartet, and the amusing sound effects man, John Smith, provided a magical evening of entertainment.

The production gave the audience an inside look at a 1946 radio broadcast of the American classic Christmas story, "It's a Wonderful Life."

Keith Wortham, presently a student at Belmont University, played the part of George Bailey to perfection. Wortham is a graduate of Community High School in Unionville, and an alumnus of the school's Smokestack Theater. His performance of George Bailey was so fun to watch and listen to.

Michael Adcock, of Shelbyville, did an amazing job of providing the voices of half the men in the town of Bedford Falls, including the cranky old Mr. Potter.

The Times-Gazette's very own John Carney provided the voice of Angel Second Class Clarence Oddbody, and gave a great performance of the angel hoping to get his wings by helping George Bailey through his life-crisis.

Lindsey Slaughter, a student at Tennessee Tech University, played the role of Mary Bailey. She also served as the musical director and was responsible for the arrangements of the musical interludes during the evening, which were fabulous.

Brenden Taylor, a senior at Middle Tennessee State University, did a great job portraying Clarence's angelic supervisor, Joseph, and Uncle Billy and Harry Bailey, as well as other townspeople.

Kyle Smith of Murfreesboro provided the voices of Zuzu Bailey and Ma Bailey, as well as others.

I was so impressed with this production and the talent that we have here in Bedford County. Most of these actors are no strangers to the stages of our area, having performed in productions in our high schools and other venues of community theatre.

Dianne Clanton and Wes Campbell were the brains behind the production, serving as artistic director and technical director. Kudos to them for a job well done.

I also want to say that we had a wonderful dinner there at Barefoot Bay Cafe during the evening. It was my first visit and certainly won't be my last.

All throughout the holiday season I was entertained and rested and refreshed, and now I am ready to move forward into a new year.

I am excited about the adventures that lay ahead in 2012. Many of you readers will be accompanying me on those adventures and I look forward to our times together.

Let's make 2012 a year to remember! May you have a "Wonderful Life!"

Doug Dezotell is the pastor of Mt. Lebanon UMC and Cannon UMC. He is a former staff writer for the Times-Gazette, and he is a husband, a father, a grandfather, and a friend to many. He can be contacted at dougmdezotell@yahoo.com.



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Doug Dezotell
Memories and Musings