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Volunteer Garden program about Duck River

Posted 6/19/21

The members agreed to assist with the annual library luncheon in October by providing the table decorations. The hostesses providing refreshments were Mary Alexander and Lynn Hulan. The June program was presented by Daryl Bernd with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. He presented a most informative and interesting program as he specializes in our area creeks, rivers, and ponds, and operates under the TWRA Fisheries Division. He has worked with TWRA for 35 years and covers 29 counties...

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Volunteer Garden program about Duck River

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Volunteer Garden Club held its June 2021 monthly meeting at the Farm Bureau at the beautiful countryside home of member Aleitha Kimbro. Program chair Becky Nichols presided over the meeting.

The members agreed to assist with the annual library luncheon in October by providing the table decorations. The hostesses providing refreshments were Mary Alexander and Lynn Hulan.

The June program was presented by Daryl Bernd with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. He presented a most informative and interesting program as he specializes in our area creeks, rivers, and ponds, and operates under the TWRA Fisheries Division. He has worked with TWRA for 35 years and covers 29 counties.

Bernd stated that our local Duck River is very unique and National Geographic covered this uniqueness and diverseness in a story. From its origin the Duck River ends its travel into Kentucky Lake. It is 289 miles long and is entirely contained in the state of Tennessee. There are approximately 150 species of fish in the Duck. With the past year of pandemic, it actually created much more work for TWRA as residents took to the river for fishing and kayaking. The Duck provides our local drinking water for approximately a quarter of million people. From the Flat Creek area thru Horton there are no big creeks which feed its stream.

Another interesting fact is that TWRA is the only state agency that funds itself through licenses and fees. For fees that funnel through the federal government, $4 is returned to TWRA. In 2019 there were approximately 600,000 licenses sold through TWRA, but in 2020 this number increased by 42%.

Bernd also shared that TWRA has a tracking program which places a cell phone transmitter on area ducks which identify their travels. Contrary to belief, these ducks will not migrate across the Mississippi River. It has also been determined that the hummingbirds are changing their migration patterns and are remaining more in our local areas rather than going south each year.

The July Garden Club meeting will be held at the Bell Buckle Park with members bringing their favorite covered dish on July 2 at 10:00 a.m.

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