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Shelby DAR honors two members

By ZOË HAGGARD - zhaggard@t-g.com
Posted 7/2/22

Shelby Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution recently honored the graves of two former members with a special DAR medallion at the Hazel Cemetery in Bell Buckle.  

Margaret May …

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Shelby DAR honors two members

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Shelby Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution recently honored the graves of two former members with a special DAR medallion at the Hazel Cemetery in Bell Buckle.  

Margaret May Delffs Featherstone, who passed away in 2017, and her daughter, Dixie Ann Parker, who passed away in 2015, were both active members of the local DAR. Their family and several chapter members attended the event to show their support at the grave dedication.  

“Dixie loved DAR and what it represents,” said chapter regent Ardis Rittenberry-Caffey. “She loved it from the time she got up to when she went to bed at night...and she loved every one of her ancestors.”  

Dixie joined the Shelby chapter of DAR in 1997 and served as regent for two different terms. She made more than 1,000 caps for veterans and also served on Bedford County Board of Education. The regent said her deepest desire was for Cascade to have a new school and that desire was honored after she passed.  

Caffey described Margaret as a “Proverbs 31 woman,” who loved her family.  

Margaret also worked with food collection drives and delivered boxes of food to needy families for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners. She joined DAR in 2009 where she knitted scarves and mailed car packages to the men and women in the military serving overseas.  

“This always gave her great joy,” said Caffey.  

Nita Carroll, the younger sister of Dixie and daughter of Margaret, said, “I remember as a little girl us making and cooking then taking that to the nursing home. My mother was like that. Dixie was like that.” 

“There are so many people who have come up to me since Dixie passed and tell me stories that I never knew. She just always gave. If they needed something, she gave it.”  

Nita said Dixie and her mother knew how to make lace, quilt and crochet, and they even had a shop in Bell Buckle that sold cross-stitching supplies.  

“So, they got to take their hobby one step further and give to the community,” she said.  

To say the least, Dixie was an inspiring big sister, as Nita was inspired to serve as a Girl Scouts leader for her daughter, Rachel. “We’ve always been a closeknit family,” she said.  

Regent Caffey finished, “We, who continue the work of the national society, carry the responsibilities, have been inspired by the lives of those whose tasks are completed 

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